Emulation Webinar SemiWiki

WP_Query Object
(
    [query] => Array
        (
            [paged] => 714
        )

    [query_vars] => Array
        (
            [paged] => 714
            [error] => 
            [m] => 
            [p] => 0
            [post_parent] => 
            [subpost] => 
            [subpost_id] => 
            [attachment] => 
            [attachment_id] => 0
            [name] => 
            [pagename] => 
            [page_id] => 0
            [second] => 
            [minute] => 
            [hour] => 
            [day] => 0
            [monthnum] => 0
            [year] => 0
            [w] => 0
            [category_name] => 
            [tag] => 
            [cat] => 
            [tag_id] => 
            [author] => 
            [author_name] => 
            [feed] => 
            [tb] => 
            [meta_key] => 
            [meta_value] => 
            [preview] => 
            [s] => 
            [sentence] => 
            [title] => 
            [fields] => 
            [menu_order] => 
            [embed] => 
            [category__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_name__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag_slug__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag_slug__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [ignore_sticky_posts] => 
            [suppress_filters] => 
            [cache_results] => 
            [update_post_term_cache] => 1
            [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1
            [update_post_meta_cache] => 1
            [post_type] => 
            [posts_per_page] => 10
            [nopaging] => 
            [comments_per_page] => 50
            [no_found_rows] => 
            [order] => DESC
        )

    [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                )

            [relation] => AND
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [queried_terms] => Array
                (
                )

            [primary_table] => wp5_posts
            [primary_id_column] => ID
        )

    [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                )

            [relation] => 
            [meta_table] => 
            [meta_id_column] => 
            [primary_table] => 
            [primary_id_column] => 
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [clauses:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [has_or_relation:protected] => 
        )

    [date_query] => 
    [queried_object] => 
    [queried_object_id] => 
    [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  wp5_posts.ID FROM wp5_posts  WHERE 1=1  AND wp5_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp5_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR wp5_posts.post_status = 'expired' OR wp5_posts.post_status = 'tribe-ea-success' OR wp5_posts.post_status = 'tribe-ea-failed' OR wp5_posts.post_status = 'tribe-ea-schedule' OR wp5_posts.post_status = 'tribe-ea-pending' OR wp5_posts.post_status = 'tribe-ea-draft')  ORDER BY wp5_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 7130, 10
    [posts] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 500
                    [post_author] => 28
                    [post_date] => 2010-03-21 20:56:00
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2010-03-21 20:56:00
                    [post_content] => The 2010 ISSCC theme  was all about “Sensing the Future” and was one of the most inspiring  semiconductor conferences I have experienced. The halls were filled with  the top names in semiconductor design and manufacture from around the  world. The sessions highlighted not only technology breakthroughs (first  4G silicon), but new semiconductor applications for humanity.

The International Solid-State Circuits Conference is the foremost forum for presentation of advances in solid-state circuits and systems-on-a-chip. The Conference offers a unique opportunity for engineers working at the cutting edge of IC design and use to maintain technical currency, and to network with leading experts.”
Per my previous blogs, mobile internet devices are a leading driver of semiconductor growth. Next-generation semiconductors will enable new mobile applications that take advantage of high-speed data connections, high-performance applications, added processing capabilities, and long battery lifetime. The result being exploding data usage and a 3G wireless bottleneck.

The first functional 4G chip for high-speed communication was highlighted, a collaboration between researchers from ETH Zurich and Advanced Circuit Pursuit. In addition, researchers from CEA-LETI described a reconfigurable chip that can implement multiple wireless standards including 4G, WIMAX, 802.11n, and Cognitive Radio. Their solution provides the necessary flexibility required to interconnect to a variety of networks using many different standards. Very cool stuff.

Also unveiled were several low-power embedded processors that break through the 1 GHz barrier, enabling the next generation of smart phones and netbooks that are fast approaching PC operating speeds. Intel and ARM presented new circuits for dynamic detection and correction of timing errors to squeeze voltage margins for reliable low- power operation over 1.5GHz, while Qualcomm describes low-power-design techniques used in their upcoming 1.4GHz Snapdragon processor core.

These innovations in both cellular/wireless standard support and low-power, high-performance embedded processors will be the building blocks for the next-generation mobile devices, bringing as-yet-unseen levels of functionality and performance to the masses. Extremely cool stuff!

A late Tuesday night panel “ Semiconductor Industry in 2025 “ looked at the challenges ahead:

The historic predictability of Moore’s Law has spurred innovation and redefined how we build integrated circuits. We have developed an eco-system of specialized entities to resolve specific challenges such as Equipment Development, Foundry Services, Design, EDA, Software, and Consumer Services. While more specialization has been an undisputed trend of the past, we are beginning to see hardware companies becoming less specialized – manufacturing companies entering design, design companies entering services, to name a few. What approach will be the predominant model in 2025? More vertically-integrated companies that enable recurring revenue? Or more horizontally- integrated companies that focus on specialized innovation?

Executives from Intel, IBM, NXP, TSMC, and Mentor Graphics presented. My favorite, of course, is Wally Rhines who made an interesting point. While other industries consolidate, the semiconductor industry de-consolidates with basically the same players in different positions depending on what technology drives the semiconductor market. In the 1970’s it was memory, microprocessors in the 1980’s, fabless semiconductor companies joined the ranks of the top 25 in the 1990’s, and mobile internet enablers experienced record growth in the last 10 years.
From 2010-2025 Wally predicts a yearly:


  • Decline in cost per function (transistor) of 35%
  • 49%+ transistor increase
  • 13%+ unit increase

The 2011 ISSCC continues on the futuristic path of semiconductors: Electronics for Healthy Living – call for papers is now available. I hope to see you there.
 [post_title] => Semiconductor Industry 2025 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => semiconductor-industry-2025 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.semiwiki.com/word5/uncategorized/semiconductor-industry-2025.html/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 499 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2010-03-07 20:49:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-03-07 20:49:00 [post_content] => According to the EETimes“The leading-edge foundry market is up for grabs, as several vendors have stumbled or been victims of the shakeout “. According to people who actually work with the foundries, like myself, the leading edge foundry market will continue to be dominated by TSMC and GlobalFoundries is the “dark horse”. Samsung is now and will always be an IDM, with the foundry business being a diversion at best.

The EETimes also claims that TSMC “stumbled and had yield issues at the 40-nm node.”Again not true. TSMC has more than 80% of the 40nm market with 60+ products in production. TSMC forecasts 40nm accounting for 20% of overall revenues at the end of 2010, compared to 9% in the fourth quarter of 2009. Other foundries would be lucky to stumble into numbers like that!
TSMC Fab 12 is currently capable of producing 80,000 12-inch equivalent wafers on 40nm every quarter and will double that by the end of 2010. TSMC’s other 300-mm GigaFab, Fab 14, can also be used to meet future 40nm demand.
The widely reported TSMC 40nm yield problems were focused on GPUs. GPU products are bleeding edge technologies that drive process development, including half nodes. There are (5) GPU players withmarket share: Intel, Nvidia, AMD/ATI, S3, and SiS. Intel is an IDM, the rest manufacture at TSMC. Why TSMC you ask? Because GPUs are the single most difficult product to yield and TSMC is the only foundry that can accommodate the insanely competitive GPU market.

According to Ana Hunter, Samsung Semiconductor Vice President of Foundry Services, after 4+ years of trying “Samsung’s share of the foundry business is not as big as we want, but it takes time to put the pieces in place and ramp designs.”Prior to Samsung, Hunter spent 9+ years at Chartered Semiconductor, which was bought by GlobalFoundries last year for pennies on the invested dollar. Hunter stated that “The foundry business is part of our core strategy” and highlighted 6 reasons why Samsung believes it will succeed:

[LIST=1]
  • Capacity – Samsung plans to double its production of chips for outside customers every year until it rivals market leader TSMC. ( Wow, good luck with that!)
  • Resources – Samsung is one of the few companies that has the resources to compete at the high-end of the foundry market. (Intel, IBM, TSMC, GFI….)
  • Leading Edge Technology – Samsung is ramping 45-nm technology at a time when TSMC and others are struggling in the arena. (Oh no she di’int!)
  • Leading Edge Technology part II – Samsung will be one of the first foundries to roll out a high-k/metal-gate solution. The technology will be offered at the 32- and 28-nm nodes, which will be rolled out this year. (TSMC and GFI will go straight to 28nm HKT this year)
  • Leading Edge Technology part III – Unlike rival TSMC, Samsung is using a gate-first, high-k technology, TSMC is going with gate-last. We think that gate-first is best suited for today’s needs. (I defer to TSMC on this one, they have forgotten more about the foundry business than most will ever know.)
  • Ecosystem – Samsung has put the EDA pieces in place for the design-for-manufacturing puzzle. (A puzzle analogy, really?)


    Now let me highlight 6 reasons why I believe Samsung will not succeed:

    [LIST=1]
  • Business Model – The Foundry business is services centric, the IDM business is not. This is a serious paradigm shift for Samsung.
  • Customer Diversity – Supporting a handful of customers/products is a far cry from supporting the 100’s of customers and 1,000′s of products TSMC does.
  • Ecosystem – An open ecosystem is required which includes supporting commercial EDA, Semiconductor IP, and Design Services companies of all shapes and sizes.
  • Conflict of InterestPure-play foundries will not compete with customers, Not-pure-play foundries (Samsung) will. Would you share sensitive design, yield, and cost data with your competitor?
  • China – The Chinese market represents the single largest growth opportunity for the foundry business. TSMC has a fab in Shanghai and 10% control of SMIC (#4), UMC (#2) has control of China’s He Jian (#11), and Samsung does not even speak Mandarin.
  • Competition – The foundry business is ultra competitive, very sticky, and product dumping will not get you from #9 to #1.

    Just my opinion of course. [post_title] => TSMC versus SAMSUNG [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tsmc-versus-samsung [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.semiwiki.com/word5/uncategorized/tsmc-versus-samsung.html/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 477 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2010-02-28 22:22:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-02-28 22:22:00 [post_content] => Last week TSMC hosted the2010 Executive Forum on Leading Edge Semiconductor Technology in Yokohama, Japan. The Senior Vice President of R&D at TSMC lectured on process development and the individual technologies for the 45/40nm, 32/28nm and 22/20nm nodes and explained the current status.

    Dr. Shang-Yi Chiang joined TSMC in July 1997 as Vice President of Research and Development (R&D). He temporarily retired from TSMC as Senior Vice President of R&D in July 2006 and returned in September 2009 to resume this position.

    Dr. Chiang, a fellow of IEEE, received his Bachelor of Science degree from National Taiwan University in 1968, his Master of Science degree from Princeton University in 1970, and his Doctorate from Stanford University in 1974, all in electrical engineering. In 2001, Dr. Chiang was chosen as one of the 50 “Stars of Asia” by BusinessWeek Magazine. This award recognizes the outstanding performance of TSMC’s R&D team under Dr. Chiang’s leadership, and his vision and strategies for continued aggressive R&D development despite the industry-wide downturn.


    The new technologies introduced for the 45/40nm process include ArF immersion exposure, the third-generation strained silicon and a low-k interlayer insulating film whose dielectric constant was lowered to 2.5. Though TSMC had chamber matching and ion implanting problems for the 45/40nm process, it has solved the problems and is now rapidly ramping the technology. The number of tape-outs have increased at a rapid rate, and half of the taped-out chips are now being mass-produced, TSMC said.

    The most important new technology for the 32/28nm process is a new gate. A SiON gate insulating film is used for the low-power type (28LP) while a high-dielectric gate insulating film and a metal gate electrode (high-k/metal gate) are used for the high-performance type (28HP) and the medium-speed, low-leakage type (28HPL).

    As a process to form the high-k/metal gate, TSMC employed the gate-gate-last process instead of the gate-first process, which the company was planning to use at first. Also, it will introduce the fourth-generation strained silicon and low-resistance Cu wiring. TSMC lowered the resistance of Cu wiring by improving the flatness of the boundary surfaces of the Cu and barrier metal to prevent electrons flowing on the surface of the wiring from scattering.

    Besides TSMC, IBM and GLOBALFOUNDRIES have initiated research projects to enable the scaling of semiconductor components to the 22 nanometer node and beyond. Back in June 2009, GlobalFoundries described an innovative technology that could overcome one of the key hurdles to advancing high-k metal gate (HKMG) transistors, enabling the next generation of mobile devices with more computing power and improved battery life.
    An interesting race indeed, the prize being the top foundry customers around the world: Qualcomm, Broadcom, Xilinx, Altera, AMD/ATI, Nvidia, Apple, etc… [post_title] => TSMC vs GlobalFoundries vs IBM [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tsmc-vs-globalfoundries-vs-ibm [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.semiwiki.com/word5/uncategorized/tsmc-vs-globalfoundries-vs-ibm.html/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 569 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2010-02-22 00:30:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-02-22 00:30:00 [post_content] => One may ask why in the semiconductor world would GlobalFoundries(GFI) exhibit at the Mobile World Congress last week, the world’s largest exhibition for the mobile industry. And not just exhibit, GFI turned out at en force with meeting rooms and bright orange signage declaring a mobile revolution. Why? Here is your first clue:

    2010 will usher in a new generation of consumer electronic devices. These devices will enable mobile internet access to an ever increasing amount of high speed data, real time audio, high definition video, and mobile television. Driven by smartphones, mobile internet devices are in hyper growth mode and represent the single largest consumer electronics market segment known to man. Remember, there are 6,795,200,000 people in the world that will need mobile internet devices. There are only about 1,000,000,000 smartphones in use today and they have a much shorter life cycle than a radio, TV, desktop, or even a laptop personal computer.

    As consumer electronic devices go mobile, the lines between televisions, computers, phones, cameras, browsers and operating systems disappear. Nowhere is this more illustrated than in the rapid rise of mobile consumption of the internet. According to the Quantcast 2009 Mobile Trends Report, the North American mobile web share is up 110% in 2009 (Dec ’09 vs. Dec ’08) and the global mobile web consumption share up 148% in 2009. Beginning with the iPhone in 2007, the Android in 2009, and the tablet PC onslaught in 2010, it’s a safe bet that the number of mobile internet devices will grow in numbers exponentially in the coming decade. The next question is: How can we simplify the design and implementation of mobile internet device hardware and software?

    The semiconductor industry has done an excellent job with technical standards in this regard. Inside mobile internet devices (smartphones) MIPI Specifications establish standards for hardware and software interfaces which allow consumers a choice of vendors for leading edge products. The MIPIAlliance, established in July 2003 by ARM, Nokia, STMicroelectronics and Texas Instruments, is an open membership organization for leading companies in the mobile industry that promote open interface specifications. The IEEE Industry Standards and Technology Organization (ISTO) administers the Alliance.

    Before MIPI was established designers faced multiple competing and proprietary physical-layer interfaces for any given system function. MIPI has reduced that to two-to-four physical-layer standards, with multiple protocols layered on top to cover various functions, all designed to last for multiple generations. A standards organization that actually works, how refreshing!

    A next generation MIPI physical layer, the M-PHY, was rolled out at MWC last week. The M comes from the Roman numeral 1000 to signify the 1000M-5GBit communication speed. The M-PHY is a serial interface technology with high bandwidth capabilities, targeted for mobile applications designed for good power efficiency and for a wide range of application protocols. The M-PHY provides higher bandwidths and uses fewer signal wires than the current D-PHY technology that it replaces.

    In the end, the central communications module will not necessarily be large but will include the user’s basic identity and some communications capabilities. The more challenging aspects will be supplying high-definition streaming video, loading of gigabyte wide movies (from the Internet) and “everyone, everywhere, seamless wireless connection to surrounding devices and services”. These future use model requirements point directly to the MIPI M-PHY. [post_title] => GlobalFoundries and the Mobile World Congress [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => globalfoundries-and-the-mobile-world-congress [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.semiwiki.com/word5/uncategorized/globalfoundries-and-the-mobile-world-congress.html/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 420 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2010-02-09 21:31:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-02-09 21:31:00 [post_content] => When AMD sought to shed its costly manufacturing unit Ibrahim Ajami saw an interesting opportunity, one that will eventually bring semiconductor manufacturing to Abu Dhabi. Let’s start with the recent interview published with Ajami, the 34 year old Chief Executive Officer of Advanced Technology Investment Company (ATIC), which is owned by the Government of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, and is the controlling shareholder of GlobalFoundries (GFI).

    GlobalFoundries wants 30% of the made-to-order chip market within three years. “Am I setting very aggressive targets? Yes,” Ajami said in a Jan 28 interview in Abu Dhabi. “We need to be a $5 billion company in the next two to three years.” A 30% share would take GlobalFoundries well past United Microelectronics Corp (UMC), making it the world’s second-largest contract manufacturer of chips after Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co (TSMC).

    Mr. Ajami also dispelled recent rumors: “ATIC won’t buy the rest of GlobalFoundries (AMD owns 34%) and the company has no interest in acquiring either United Micro or South Korea’s Hynix Semiconductor Inc.”, Ajami said. “It doesn’t fit with our strategy right now,” he said. “UMC is another foundry in Taiwan and we’re not looking to go there right now and Hynix is a memory company. Memory is not what we’re focused on right now”.

    Ajami earned his BS degree from Northeastern University in Boston in 1998 and his MBA from the University of Southern California in 2004. His semiconductor experience comes from the creation of a Silicon Valley startup called ViralSounds Inc., and he worked for Packard Bell/NEC. Ajami, associate director of the acquisitions unit of Mubadala, was tapped to become CEO of ATIC and led the $7.5 billion acquisitions of AMD manufacturing and Chartered Semiconductor that we now call GlobalFoundries.



    As I mentioned in TSMC versus GlobalFoundries Part I and Part II, GFI will compete head-to-head with TSMC in the first source semiconductor market, while UMC and SMIC are content to be second and third source semiconductor manufacturers. GFI has not been shy about their challenge to TSMC’s wafer supremacy and TSMC has responded in kind by increasing capital expenditures, increasing R&D expenses, and hiring thousands of engineers.

    During my January visit to Taiwan there was definitely excitement in the air at TSMC. The Fab lobbies were filled with job applicants, the Fab cafeterias and coffee shops were abuzz, and meetings were much harder to coordinate, a very big change from a few months ago. On a side note, the food in Fab 12 is by far the tastiest and EVA Airlines is the absolute best carrier from the US to Taiwan, but I digress.

    Whether or not GFI is a serious threat to TSMC’s foundry supremacy, TSMC is certainly using GFI’s public relations activities to motivate employees. Déjà vu when the deep pockets of the Chinese government funded SMIC. Unfortunately, as it turned out, SMIC was a sheep in wolf’s clothing. GFI on the other hand looks more like a wolf in an Armani suit. [post_title] => The GlobalFoundries Enigma [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-globalfoundries-enigma [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.semiwiki.com/word5/uncategorized/the-globalfoundries-enigma.html/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 427 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2010-01-31 23:49:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-01-31 23:49:00 [post_content] => Transistors may be shrinking but atoms are not. Transistors are now just a handful of atoms so it matters even more when a couple of those atoms are out of place. Process variations, whether they are statistical, proximity, or otherwise, have got to be thoughtfully accounted for if we are to achieve the low-power, high-performance, and high yield design goals at 28nm.

    A recent seminar byTSMC and Synopsys entitled “32/28nm Challenges – The EDA Vendor and Foundry Perspective” brought perspective to the coming design challenges. The TSMC section presented by Tom Quan is well worth seeing. Tom Quan has 30 years design and product development experience in the AMS market space. You won’t find a more engaging speaker on process variation than Tom Quan.

    TSMC’s value proposition for moving to the 28nm process supports Moore’s Law with a better than 2X gate density at 28nm versus 40nm, a significant speed gain, plus reduced power leakage and an overall cost reduction. Target applications for 28nm include high performance computing and peripherals, low power devices such as HD video cameras, mobile internet and mobile computing, home and portable entertainment. TSMC’s Advanced Technology Roadmap is on track for the low power 28nm process in Q210 and high performance-high K metal gate 28nm process in Q310.

    Tom Quan’s emphasis on the importance of “Variation-Aware Design” is justified. To start with, a smaller manufacturing window with much less margin to begin with equals more variation. Add to that the fact that global variation is constant, but local variation increases significantly as channel width and length decreases, and you will have a requirement for variation-aware design tools prior to GDS.
    The overall TSMC design ecosystem emphasis is on collaboration between design and process. Tom divided this responsibility into Foundry: better SPICE accuracy, DFM rules, providing variation aware reference design kits (RDKs), and restricted design rules (RDRs). Designers: must be aware of layout effects, analyze-fix variation-aware methodologies will be required for area-yield tradeoffs, and pre- vs. post-layout simulation accuracy. The clear implication is that designers need to change their mindset in adopting a variation-aware design methodology as a requirement versus a luxury.

    The conclusions are obvious. Partnerships between the foundry, EDA and SemIP providers, and customers will be required to eliminate silicon waste at 28nm. Partnerships that are friendly and cost effective, with shared responsibility will result in productive and innovative solutions to even the most technologically advanced challenges.

    I’ve covered semiconductor process variation in my blogs on TSMC Process Variation, TSMC 40nm Yield Explained, Moore’s Law and 40nm Yield, and most recently Moore’s Law and 28nm Yield. I also work on process variation with the foundries and top semiconductor companies through strategic relationships with Solido Design Automation. Device sensitivity and process variability is something you will have to carefully model and design to at 28nm so be sure and look for variation aware methodologies before you start. [post_title] => TSMC 28nm Design Advisory [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tsmc-28nm-design-advisory [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.semiwiki.com/word5/uncategorized/tsmc-28nm-design-advisory.html/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 479 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2010-01-24 22:44:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-01-24 22:44:00 [post_content] => This blog is a follow-up to my second most viewed page Moore’s Law and 40nm Yield, with a strong recommendation of how to design for yield at the advanced nodes (32/28/22nm) with Verify High-Sigma design technology.



    Case in point: Circuit blocks such as complex standard cells or memory bit cells are repeated thousands or even millions of times on a die. For the overall chip to have good yield, the repeated block must have extremely high yield. Calculating yield in this context is very important due to increasing process variations at each new technology node.

    One approach would be to use Monte Carlo sampling. Unfortunately, this would require far too many simulations: a circuit with 99.9999% yield would need, on average, 1 million samples from the true distribution just to observe a single failure against circuit specifications.



    Compared to a plain Monte Carlo simulation, Verify High-Sigma design is orders of magnitude faster for estimating yields of high sigma circuits.

    With a normal Monte Carlo run, process points are drawn directly from the process variation distribution. The problem, as noted earlier, is that far too many samples are needed in order to get failures in the design. Verify High-Sigma Design changes this by sampling from a different distribution, in which a greater proportion of samples are failures. This approach is a variant of importance sampling. Verify High-Sigma Design estimates the yield of high-sigma circuits by:


    [LIST=1]
  • Creating a new sampling distribution such that a greater proportion of samples are failures.
  • Drawing samples from the new distribution, simulating them, and seeing if they meet specifications.
  • Estimating yield by mathematically unbiasing the samples, according to importance sampling formula.
  • Computing yield accuracy, using a statistical technique called bootstrapping.


    To illustrate that Verify High-Sigma (VHS) design returns yield estimates as accurate as a standard Monte Carlo (MC) run, the following table compares MC and VHS yield estimation results across 6 different circuits on moderate-yield circuits (moderate yield so that MC only needs a moderate number of samples to make a good yield estimate). For all 6 cases, the yield estimates for VHS and MC agree because their yield confidence bounds overlap.

    [TABLE] style="width: 528px"
    |-
    | style="width: 107px" | Circuit
    | style="width: 209px" | MC Yield (up to 10K samples)
    | style="width: 213px" | VHS Yield (250 samples)
    |-
    | style="width: 107px" | Current mirror
    | style="width: 209px" | 99.580% (99.433% – 99.689%)
    | style="width: 213px" | 99.709% (99.569% – 99.808%)
    |-
    | style="width: 107px" | GMC
    | width="209" | 99.836% (99.519% – 99.944%)
    | width="213" | 99.831% (99.752% – 99.885%)
    |-
    | width="107" | LNA
    | width="209" | 99.950% (99.883% – 99.979%)
    | width="213" | 99.888% (99.760% – 99.9662%)
    |-
    | width="107" | Folded opamp
    | width="209" | 99.221% (98.027% – 99.699%)
    | width="213" | 99.490% (98.639% – 99.370%)
    |-
    | width="107" | CP
    | width="209" | 99.597% (99.410% – 99.725%)
    | width="213" | 99.522% (99.291% – 99.682%)
    |-





    When design teams and managers consider which advanced technologies to incorporate in their flows, their metrics include quality of results (QoR), use model, ease of adoption, and cost. Verify High-Sigma design technology addresses each of these metrics. Designers can improve the quality of their results by changing their designs using High-Sigma extracted corners. They can statistically verify their designs with SPICE accuracy in a relatively short amount of time.




     [post_title] => Moore’s Law and 28nm Yield [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => moores-law-and-28nm-yield [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 20:51:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 01:51:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.semiwiki.com/word5/uncategorized/moores-law-and-28nm-yield.html/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 436 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2010-01-17 11:52:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-01-17 11:52:00 [post_content] => The foundry business is a tough one. The golden age of semiconductors is clearly over and what remains is a highly competitive marketplace. This blog follows up my original TSMC vs Global Foundries which is the single most viewed page on my site.

    Case in point #1: Founded in 2000, SMIC Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation is billed as one of the leading semiconductor foundries in the world and the largest and most advanced foundry in Mainland China. Harvard Business School even wrote a case study on SMIC’s business model, characterized as a Reverse Build-Operate-Transfer (BOT). Unfortunately cheap labor does not a foundry make. It takes highly experienced workers, advanced manufacturing technology, strategic marketing, and an ultra competitive business model. The semiconductor foundry business is a marathon, not a sprint. Also see TSMC vs SMIC.

    Case in point #2: Chartered Semiconductor was created in 1987 as one of the world’s dedicated semiconductor foundries. Chartered Semiconductor continued a string of losing quarters until the Abu Dhabi government-owned Advanced Technology Investment Company (ATIC) acquisition was passed by investors in a majority vote. Shareholders bought Chartered shares at the 1999 initial public offering (IPO) price of S$3.34, the shares were later consolidated at 10 for 1, so they effectively cost S$33.40 each. ATIC paid S$2.68 a share. Chartered had experienced workers and strategic marketing (Common Platform), but lacked the advanced manufacturing technology and competitive business model to be successful.
    2010 brings us a truly global foundry with the ATIC acquisitions of the manufacturing arm of AMD and Chartered Semiconductor. Global Foundries now employs 10,000+ people spanning 3 continents and 12 locations with manufacturing operations in Singapore, Dresden, Germany, and a new leading-edge fab under construction in Saratoga County, New York. Global Foundries was founded with $4.5 billion in cash, with future backing going up to $7B. The New York fab alone will cost an estimated $4.5B.

    GFI now has about $3B in revenues from more than 150 customers that include many of the world’s top fabless and fab-lite companies, such as AMD, Qualcomm, STMicro, IBM, and Toshiba. Process geometries in production are: .5um, .35um, .25um, .13um, .18um, 90nm, 65nm, and 45/40nm. Process geometries in planning are: 32/28nm and 22/20nm. Planned capacity is 1.6 million 300mm wafers annually by 2014, supplemented by 2.2 million 200mm wafers a year. Global Foundries has highly experienced workers from Chartered Semiconductor and AMD, cutting edge manufacturing technology from AMD and IBM, strategic marketing from Common Platform, add in a competitive business model and you will have the #2 foundry in the world.

    In comparison TSMC has 23,000+ employees and will add 3,000 more in 2010. With $10B+ in annual revenues, TSMC accounts for 50% of the foundry market revenue and 80% of the profits. TSMC is considered a first source for semiconductor manufacture, meaning that leading fabless semiconductor companies work with TSMC first, then replicate manufacturing at the other foundries for redundancy and cost reductions. Global Foundries will challenge TSMC for first sourcing with AMD manufacturing technology and a manufacturing process partnership with IBM. In fact the first production 28nm wafers by a foundry were displayed by GFI at the Consumer Electronics show in Las Vegas this month. At least one of the wafers contained AMD/ATI GPUs.

    Unfortunately the semiconductor foundry market is a maturing industry and likely to experience single digit annual growth in coming years. To diversify, TSMC is investing heavily in solar power and light-emitting diodes. Both are fast growing markets, have technological overlap with chip production, and offer far better margins and upside potential. There is a reason why TSMC is the #1 foundry in the world and I don’t see that changing anytime soon. But competition breeds innovation so the foundry business will be much more interesting to watch with GFI challenging TSMC. [post_title] => TSMC versus Global Foundries Part II [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tsmc-versus-global-foundries-part-ii [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.semiwiki.com/word5/uncategorized/tsmc-versus-global-foundries-part-ii.html/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 437 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2009-12-31 20:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-12-31 20:00:00 [post_content] =>
    Any questions? Christmas was good for electronics and the start of a prosperous semiconductor New Year. Semiconductor inventories are low and demand is increasing around the world. Remember, there are 1,338,612,968 people in China that will need mobile internet devices and the stimulus money is gushing over there. There are a total of 6,795,200,000 people in the world that will need mobile internet devices and today there are only about 1,000,000,000 smartphones in use. Considering that you will purchase a new smartphone every 2-3 years, if you believe 2010 will be a good year for semiconductors, 2011 will be even better.

    As consumer electronic devices go mobile, the lines between televisions, computers, phones, cameras, video games, browsers and operating systems will disappear. An electronics bubble has begun and I’m thrilled to be part of it. The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas last week was certainly an excellent start. CES is an industry recognized barometer as 100,000+ gadget geeks ogle 2,500+ exhibitors with an estimated 20k+ new products.
    What I look for personally is technology that will change my life. Porsche changed my life in the 70’s, personal computers in the 80’s, laptops in the 90’s, and the smartphone in the 2000′s. For the next decade it is too soon to tell but certainly nothing at CES this year will change my life. Tablet PCs? 3D TV? E-Readers? YAWN. My prediction is that social media and mobile internet devices will continue to drive semiconductor revenue in the 2010′s.




    Speaking of audio, be sure and check out the Virage/ARC Sonic Focus demo. Audiofile or not, the sound quality will amaze you. The embedded processor companies were at CES in force, Nvidia even announced their own Tegra mobile embedded processor. But the most impressive demo is the Sonic Focus audio enrichment software which brings realism back to digitally compressed audio. Speaker size and placement will always be a problem for mobile internet, data will always be compressed, devices will get thinner and lighter. Using technology created by artisans and engineers founded in the music industry, Sonic Focus IP technologies deliver audio performance of today’s consumer devices and enable an immersive, engaging and compelling experience. Hearing is believing so check it out.

    My award for best gadget goes to Samsung’s 14-inch transparent display. Not that it would change my life but it definitely has the cool factor! Also, if you missed the CEO keynotes, as I did, they are all on the CES front page. Very polished, very Las Vegas, somewhat informative, definitely worth streaming on your mobile internet device while you drive or wait in line for a $5 cup of coffee. [post_title] => 2010 Semiconductor Recovery [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 2010-semiconductor-recovery [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://35.226.139.164/uncategorized/437-2010-semiconductor-recovery/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 441 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2009-12-31 20:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-12-31 20:00:00 [post_content] =>
    It was an interesting week in Taiwan for sure. Typhoon Fanapi, lightning storms, the first 28nm production silicon, foundry re-orgs, and most importantly Moon Cake pastries! Wednesday was the Chinese Moon (Zhongqiu)Festival, in Taiwan it is a National holiday commonly celebrated by people barbecuing various meats outdoors. I just love those moon cakes!

    The biggest news is that Altera demonstrated production silicon @ TSMC 28nm for the Stratix V FPGA family, originally unveiled in April of this year. Altera is using the HP (high performance) version of TSMC 28nm, the same process that the GPU vendors use, so expect TSMC 28nm production silicon announcements from Nvidia and AMD/ATI in the next quarter or so. Altera was the first to yield on TSMC 40nm so they clearly know what they are doing. Xilinx will also use TSMC 28nm, expect an announcement this week.

    Speaking of Nvidia, CEO Jen-Hsun Huang did a candid interview on the technical difficulties of the TSMC 40nm Fermi chip:

    “The parasitic characterization from our foundries and the tools and reality are simply not related, at all. We found a major breakdown between the models, the tools, and reality.”

    You can interpret this different ways and the press certainly will. Enlightened semiconductor people know however that process models evolve while processes ramp. Early access companies such as Nvidia, Altera, AMD/ATI, Qualcomm, etc… start designs with pre production process models. The amount of changes to the models varies but 40nm broke revision records for sure. I have seen this many times while working with early access IP companies.

    As I blogged in:


    • Moore's Law and 40nm Yield
    • TSMC 40nm Yield Explained
    • EDA Marketing Fail TSMC Process Variation

    Process variation really kicked in at 40nm and those that prepared yielded, those that didn’t, didn’t, simple as that. The process models had variation built into them but the main stream EDA tools did not. So Jen-Hsun was right, there was a major breakdown between the models and the tools. The reality breakdown however was a design management issue within Nvidia, which Jen-Hsun acknowledged in the interview.
    The other news from Taiwan is the departures of Fu-Cheih Hsu and S.T. Juang from the TSMC Design and Technology Platform unit, founders of the TSMC Open Innovation Platform (OIP). EETimes broke the story on 9/20/2010 with “TSMC’s Design Guru Resigns”. Fu-Cheih actually left in August (typical mainstream media lag) with S.T. Juang following him in September.

    I’ve received a lot of emails on this from vendors and customers alike. The big question is: will the TSMC OIP initiative continue? The answer of course is: YES it will. Fu-Cheih’s replacement is Cliff Hou who is even more qualified to advance the OIP agenda. Cliff is much more approachable, easy to work with, and has more “hands-on” semiconductor design enablement experience.

    Cliff joined TSMC in Dec 1997 as a section manager responsible for process design kit (PDK) and reference flow development from 0.35m to 65nm. In 2007 Cliff became senior director of TSMC in-house IP development. TSMC IP includes: standard cells, IO’s, embedded memory compilers, analog blocks, and high-speed interface modules. He has a B.S. degree from National Chiao-Tung University, and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University, New York. He is also a member of the board of directors of Global Unichip Corp. Cliff knows semiconductor design enablement, absolutely. [post_title] => TSMC Yields @ 28nm! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tsmc-yields-28nm [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://35.226.139.164/uncategorized/441-tsmc-yields-28nm/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 500 [post_author] => 28 [post_date] => 2010-03-21 20:56:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-03-21 20:56:00 [post_content] => The 2010 ISSCC theme was all about “Sensing the Future” and was one of the most inspiring semiconductor conferences I have experienced. The halls were filled with the top names in semiconductor design and manufacture from around the world. The sessions highlighted not only technology breakthroughs (first 4G silicon), but new semiconductor applications for humanity.

    The International Solid-State Circuits Conference is the foremost forum for presentation of advances in solid-state circuits and systems-on-a-chip. The Conference offers a unique opportunity for engineers working at the cutting edge of IC design and use to maintain technical currency, and to network with leading experts.”
    Per my previous blogs, mobile internet devices are a leading driver of semiconductor growth. Next-generation semiconductors will enable new mobile applications that take advantage of high-speed data connections, high-performance applications, added processing capabilities, and long battery lifetime. The result being exploding data usage and a 3G wireless bottleneck.

    The first functional 4G chip for high-speed communication was highlighted, a collaboration between researchers from ETH Zurich and Advanced Circuit Pursuit. In addition, researchers from CEA-LETI described a reconfigurable chip that can implement multiple wireless standards including 4G, WIMAX, 802.11n, and Cognitive Radio. Their solution provides the necessary flexibility required to interconnect to a variety of networks using many different standards. Very cool stuff.

    Also unveiled were several low-power embedded processors that break through the 1 GHz barrier, enabling the next generation of smart phones and netbooks that are fast approaching PC operating speeds. Intel and ARM presented new circuits for dynamic detection and correction of timing errors to squeeze voltage margins for reliable low- power operation over 1.5GHz, while Qualcomm describes low-power-design techniques used in their upcoming 1.4GHz Snapdragon processor core.

    These innovations in both cellular/wireless standard support and low-power, high-performance embedded processors will be the building blocks for the next-generation mobile devices, bringing as-yet-unseen levels of functionality and performance to the masses. Extremely cool stuff!

    A late Tuesday night panel “ Semiconductor Industry in 2025 “ looked at the challenges ahead:

    The historic predictability of Moore’s Law has spurred innovation and redefined how we build integrated circuits. We have developed an eco-system of specialized entities to resolve specific challenges such as Equipment Development, Foundry Services, Design, EDA, Software, and Consumer Services. While more specialization has been an undisputed trend of the past, we are beginning to see hardware companies becoming less specialized – manufacturing companies entering design, design companies entering services, to name a few. What approach will be the predominant model in 2025? More vertically-integrated companies that enable recurring revenue? Or more horizontally- integrated companies that focus on specialized innovation?

    Executives from Intel, IBM, NXP, TSMC, and Mentor Graphics presented. My favorite, of course, is Wally Rhines who made an interesting point. While other industries consolidate, the semiconductor industry de-consolidates with basically the same players in different positions depending on what technology drives the semiconductor market. In the 1970’s it was memory, microprocessors in the 1980’s, fabless semiconductor companies joined the ranks of the top 25 in the 1990’s, and mobile internet enablers experienced record growth in the last 10 years.
    From 2010-2025 Wally predicts a yearly:


    • Decline in cost per function (transistor) of 35%
    • 49%+ transistor increase
    • 13%+ unit increase

    The 2011 ISSCC continues on the futuristic path of semiconductors: Electronics for Healthy Living – call for papers is now available. I hope to see you there.
     [post_title] => Semiconductor Industry 2025 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => semiconductor-industry-2025 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-14 21:36:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-15 02:36:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.semiwiki.com/word5/uncategorized/semiconductor-industry-2025.html/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 7151 [max_num_pages] => 716 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => 1 [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => f2c605eaed1e18fba5f184da6a966718 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) [tribe_is_event] => [tribe_is_multi_posttype] => [tribe_is_event_category] => [tribe_is_event_venue] => [tribe_is_event_organizer] => [tribe_is_event_query] => [tribe_is_past] => [tribe_controller] => Tribe\Events\Views\V2\Query\Event_Query_Controller Object ( [filtering_query:protected] => WP_Query Object *RECURSION* ) )
  • Semiconductor Industry 2025

    Semiconductor Industry 2025
    by Daniel Nenni on 03-21-2010 at 8:56 pm

    The 2010 ISSCC theme was all about “Sensing the Future” and was one of the most inspiring semiconductor conferences I have experienced. The halls were filled with the top names in semiconductor design and manufacture from around the world. The sessions highlighted not only technology breakthroughs (first 4G silicon), but new… Read More


    TSMC versus SAMSUNG

    TSMC versus SAMSUNG
    by Daniel Nenni on 03-07-2010 at 8:49 pm

    According to the EETimes“The leading-edge foundry market is up for grabs, as several vendors have stumbled or been victims of the shakeout “. According to people who actually work with the foundries, like myself, the leading edge foundry market will continue to be dominated by TSMC and GlobalFoundries is the “dark horse”. SamsungRead More


    TSMC vs GlobalFoundries vs IBM

    TSMC vs GlobalFoundries vs IBM
    by Daniel Nenni on 02-28-2010 at 10:22 pm

    Last week TSMC hosted the2010 Executive Forum on Leading Edge Semiconductor Technology in Yokohama, Japan. The Senior Vice President of R&D at TSMC lectured on process development and the individual technologies for the 45/40nm, 32/28nm and 22/20nm nodes and explained the current status.

    Dr. Shang-Yi Chiang joined TSMC… Read More


    GlobalFoundries and the Mobile World Congress

    GlobalFoundries and the Mobile World Congress
    by Daniel Nenni on 02-22-2010 at 12:30 am

    One may ask why in the semiconductor world would GlobalFoundries(GFI) exhibit at the Mobile World Congress last week, the world’s largest exhibition for the mobile industry. And not just exhibit, GFI turned out at en force with meeting rooms and bright orange signage declaring a mobile revolution. Why? Here is your first clue:… Read More


    The GlobalFoundries Enigma

    The GlobalFoundries Enigma
    by Daniel Nenni on 02-09-2010 at 9:31 pm

    When AMD sought to shed its costly manufacturing unit Ibrahim Ajami saw an interesting opportunity, one that will eventually bring semiconductor manufacturing to Abu Dhabi. Let’s start with the recent interview published with Ajami, the 34 year old Chief Executive Officer of Advanced Technology Investment Company (ATIC),… Read More


    TSMC 28nm Design Advisory

    TSMC 28nm Design Advisory
    by Daniel Nenni on 01-31-2010 at 11:49 pm

    Transistors may be shrinking but atoms are not. Transistors are now just a handful of atoms so it matters even more when a couple of those atoms are out of place. Process variations, whether they are statistical, proximity, or otherwise, have got to be thoughtfully accounted for if we are to achieve the low-power, high-performance,… Read More


    Moore’s Law and 28nm Yield

    Moore’s Law and 28nm Yield
    by Daniel Nenni on 01-24-2010 at 10:44 pm

    This blog is a follow-up to my second most viewed page Moore’s Law and 40nm Yield, with a strong recommendation of how to design for yield at the advanced nodes (32/28/22nm) with Verify High-Sigma design technology.

    Case in point: Circuit blocks such as complex standard cells or memory bit cells are repeated thousands or even millions… Read More


    TSMC versus Global Foundries Part II

    TSMC versus Global Foundries Part II
    by Daniel Nenni on 01-17-2010 at 11:52 am

    The foundry business is a tough one. The golden age of semiconductors is clearly over and what remains is a highly competitive marketplace. This blog follows up my original TSMC vs Global Foundries which is the single most viewed page on my site.

    Case in point #1: Founded in 2000, SMIC Semiconductor Manufacturing International … Read More


    2010 Semiconductor Recovery

    2010 Semiconductor Recovery
    by Daniel Nenni on 12-31-2009 at 8:00 pm


    Any questions? Christmas was good for electronics and the start of a prosperous semiconductor New Year. Semiconductor inventories are low and demand is increasing around the world. Remember, there are 1,338,612,968 people in China that will need mobile internet devices and the stimulus money is gushing over there. There are… Read More


    TSMC Yields @ 28nm!

    TSMC Yields @ 28nm!
    by Daniel Nenni on 12-31-2009 at 8:00 pm


    It was an interesting week in Taiwan for sure. Typhoon Fanapi, lightning storms, the first 28nm production silicon, foundry re-orgs, and most importantly Moon Cake pastries! Wednesday was the Chinese Moon (Zhongqiu)Festival, in Taiwan it is a National holiday commonly celebrated by people barbecuing various meats outdoors.… Read More