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ISSCC 2021 Plenary Keynode Speech from tsmc Chairman Dr. Mark Liu

hist78

Active member
300 billion transistors on a chip/chiplet! Will that enable one super computer at every home, every school, every company, and on every car?
 
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Fred Chen

Moderator
FWIW, the 350W looks like part of the ASML lab trend mentioned some time ago (SPIE reports are still 250W in the field).

Also, the patterning comparison is done at 40-50 nm pitch; can't be ~30 nm with that pattern.
 

Daniel Nenni

Admin
Staff member
TSMC ISSCC 2021 Keynote Discussion

I’m not sure everyone understands the possible ramifications of Intel outsourcing CPU/GPU designs to TSMC so let’s review:

Intel and AMD will be on the same process so architecture and design will be the focus. More direct comparisons can be made.​
Intel will have higher volumes than AMD so pricing might be an issue. TSMC wafers cost about 20% less than Intel if you want to do the margins math.​
Intel will have designs on both Intel 7nm and TSMC 3nm so direct PDK/process comparisons can be made.​

Bottom line: 2023 will be a watershed moment for Intel manufacturing, absolutely!
 

Paul2

Member
300 billion transistors on a chip/chiplet! Will that enable one super computer at every home, every school, every company, and on every car?
The industry will likelly beat the 1T mark by the end of the decade even without monolithic 3D, or moving to something else than CMOS.
 
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