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What Prevents China’s Military From Repurposing Samsung’s 3nm ASIC’s Sold To Chinese Crypto Miners?

fansink

Active member
No takers?

I’m surprised, given the recent news about U.S. further limiting China’s access to tools necessary for 14nm process nodes.

In addition the U.S. CHIPS Act specifically bars companies that receive federal funding from “materially expanding” production of chips more advanced than 28 nanometers (28nm) in countries of concern like China and Russia, for 10 years.
 
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tonyget

Active member
Anyone in the industry knows that military doesn't require advanced nodes. Only click-baiting media and politicians like to talk about cutting-edge node and defence in the same context.

Read some articles regarding the correlation between node dimension and EMI resistance,you would know the drawbacks of advanced node compare to mature node.

Also, ASIC is not FPGA. You cannot "repurposing" ASIC chips to do what it is not intend to do
 

count

Well-known member
Also, ASIC is not FPGA. You cannot "repurposing" ASIC chips to do what it is not intend to do

This. ASIC stands for Application Specific Integrated Circuit.

It's clear that the Russian military is repurposing FPGAs from consumer electronics for military applications.
 

hist78

Well-known member
Russia and CCP can pick and choose whatever chips available from the open market or salvage them from consumer products for military purposes. The obvious problem is the reliability, accuracy and endurance under harsh environment (natural or interference injected by enemies).

We can see such poor performance from those Russian guided missiles hitting meaningless targets (like empty farmland or empty fields in cities) in the invasion of Ukraine.
 
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Paul2

Active member
Anyone in the industry knows that military doesn't require advanced nodes. Only click-baiting media and politicians like to talk about cutting-edge node and defence in the same context.

Read some articles regarding the correlation between node dimension and EMI resistance,you would know the drawbacks of advanced node compare to mature node.

Also, ASIC is not FPGA. You cannot "repurposing" ASIC chips to do what it is not intend to do


Anyone in the industry knows that military almost exclusively uses FPGAs these days instead of ASICs. Real purpose made military silicon is either something relegated to top tier national projects like nuclear warhead detonators, and navigation, or something super-old from time when cheap FPGAs weren't up to the task.
 

Paul2

Active member
This. ASIC stands for Application Specific Integrated Circuit.

It's clear that the Russian military is repurposing FPGAs from consumer electronics for military applications.

Yes, it's funny that you can get FPGAs in surprising places these days. A motor driver "ASIC" may be just a dead fused FPGA+flash combo. Or a chip to provide hardware button interlock for a control panel, as an equivalent set of 7400s will be more expensive than a cheapest FPGA. Yet, that FPGA may have more gates than a $20,000 FPGA from 20 years ago.
 
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