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What does Intel's mobile retreat mean for Android x86 support?

count

Well-known member
This is a question that's been on my mind. My understanding is that Intel spends a fair bit of money on x86 support for Android. While Intel exiting mobile will this support continue? If so, will Android drop x86?
 

lefty

Member
Although Intel still is in the High end tablet market, that's mostly Windows. I'd say that interest will dwindle and it'll slowly die as x86 tablets peter out of the market.
 

hist78

Well-known member
This is a question that's been on my mind. My understanding is that Intel spends a fair bit of money on x86 support for Android. While Intel exiting mobile will this support continue? If so, will Android drop x86?

I think from Intel's past behavior, Intel will pay Google (or someone) $100 million or more to make Android run on x86 platform if things go really bad. So will Android drop x86? I'd say it won't.
 

count

Well-known member
I think from Intel's past behavior, Intel will pay Google (or someone) $100 million or more to make Android run on x86 platform if things go really bad. So will Android drop x86? I'd say it won't.

I tend to agree with this. I can't see Intel letting Android x86 support die, even given a lack of sales on the platform. However as Android evolves, it could get increasingly costly to support multiple architectures. It's interesting to note from a historic perspective that Windows supported a large number of architectures until the mid 90s including Alpha, MIPS, PowerPC, and ARM. It just became unwieldy.
 
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