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Taiwan restricts exports of strategic high-tech commodities to Russia and Belarus

Xebec

Active member

Microprocessors or microcircuits with any of the following conditions are under the ban: (1) Performance speeds reach 5 gigaFlops or higher and an arithmetic logic unit has access width of 32 bits or more; (2) clock frequency rates exceed 25MHz; (3) more than one data or instruction bus or one serial communication port that provide direct external interconnection between parallel microcircuits at a transfer rate of 2.5MB/s.

ICs with more than 144 pins or basic gate propagation delay time of less than 0.4 nanosecond are also prohibited.

Alignment and exposure equipment for wafer production using photo-optical or X-ray methods, such as lithography equipment which includes image projection and transfer, step-and-repeat operation (direct step on wafers) or step-and-scan operation (scanners) processing, as well as scanning electron microscopes designed for automatic inspection of patterns of semiconductor devices are under the ban as well.

..

(On a personal note - I'm curious what architecture achieves > 5 GFLOPS at 25 MHz :) )
 

hist78

Well-known member

Microprocessors or microcircuits with any of the following conditions are under the ban: (1) Performance speeds reach 5 gigaFlops or higher and an arithmetic logic unit has access width of 32 bits or more; (2) clock frequency rates exceed 25MHz; (3) more than one data or instruction bus or one serial communication port that provide direct external interconnection between parallel microcircuits at a transfer rate of 2.5MB/s.

ICs with more than 144 pins or basic gate propagation delay time of less than 0.4 nanosecond are also prohibited.

Alignment and exposure equipment for wafer production using photo-optical or X-ray methods, such as lithography equipment which includes image projection and transfer, step-and-repeat operation (direct step on wafers) or step-and-scan operation (scanners) processing, as well as scanning electron microscopes designed for automatic inspection of patterns of semiconductor devices are under the ban as well.

..

(On a personal note - I'm curious what architecture achieves > 5 GFLOPS at 25 MHz :) )

Because the bar is set so low, it probably means all modern semiconductor products and equipments are in the prohibited list.
 

tonyget

Active member

Russia restricts exports of Helium & Neon sourced by Western & E Asian microchip firms

Russia has restricted the export of gases (Helium, Neon etc) necessary for the production of microchips and this could adversely impact firms in USA, Japan, South Korea and Netherlands among others.

The deliveries will now be carried out only by the decision of the Government of the Russian Federation, according to a resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers.

The restrictions were a response to the ban on supplying Russia with semiconductors necessary for the production of microchips.

However, without Russian neon, argon and helium, it will be more difficult for some countries to produce electronics, sources claimed.

The world markets are highly dependent on Russian supplies — they provide up to 30% of neon consumption.

Russia will be able to export these gases in exchange for importing semiconductors. The Ministry of Industry and Trade has confirmed that it will take into account the agreements reached when taking decisions on export supplies of these gases.

In April, the White House warned chipmakers to diversify their supply chains in case Russia reacts to tech export restrictions by blocking U.S. access to some key materials for making chips. These fears were reinforced by a Techcet report, which highlighted the dependence of semiconductor manufacturers on materials of Russian and Ukrainian origin, such as neon and palladium.
 

hist78

Well-known member

Russia restricts exports of Helium & Neon sourced by Western & E Asian microchip firms

Russia has restricted the export of gases (Helium, Neon etc) necessary for the production of microchips and this could adversely impact firms in USA, Japan, South Korea and Netherlands among others.

The deliveries will now be carried out only by the decision of the Government of the Russian Federation, according to a resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers.

The restrictions were a response to the ban on supplying Russia with semiconductors necessary for the production of microchips.

However, without Russian neon, argon and helium, it will be more difficult for some countries to produce electronics, sources claimed.

The world markets are highly dependent on Russian supplies — they provide up to 30% of neon consumption.

Russia will be able to export these gases in exchange for importing semiconductors. The Ministry of Industry and Trade has confirmed that it will take into account the agreements reached when taking decisions on export supplies of these gases.

In April, the White House warned chipmakers to diversify their supply chains in case Russia reacts to tech export restrictions by blocking U.S. access to some key materials for making chips. These fears were reinforced by a Techcet report, which highlighted the dependence of semiconductor manufacturers on materials of Russian and Ukrainian origin, such as neon and palladium.

"However, without Russian neon, argon and helium, it will be more difficult for some countries to produce electronics, sources claimed."

I am wondering who are those countries that this indiatimes.com author didn't name? Or this author falls into a simple Russian propaganda?

Using Helium gas an example. Russia is an important producing country and it has potential to supply more helium in the future with its new helium processing plant. But there are several countries such as US, Qatar, Algeria, and Australia also produce helium. The price of helium has gone up significantly due to the disruption but it's far from a disaster.

World Helium Production and Reserves:

1654355879657.png

Source: https://pubs.usgs.gov/periodicals/mcs2022/mcs2022-helium.pdf
 

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Paul2

Active member
Because the bar is set so low, it probably means all modern semiconductor products and equipments are in the prohibited list.

It actually doesn't hurt munitions, or weapon station electronics much. Russian military electronic's Achilles heel is RF, power, and other high-end analog parts.

Generic MCUs scavenged from washing machines will be good for virtually anything military computing-wise.

Missiles before nineties used huge transformers to drive high static torque servos around the world, except for most advanced, BMD grade American missiles.

Now, a generic IGBT will easily drive a huge servo at 100A.

Solid state RF also advanced tremendously. Most military RF stuff designed in the last 2 decades is completely impossible to do with tubes.

Safing the supply chain for high power servo driver IGBTs, and RF parts is incomparably easier than for consumer MCUs, because there is not much uses for these parts in the civilian domain.
 
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