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SEMI Applauds President Biden, Bipartisan Congressional Leaders for Supporting Semiconductor Supply Chain Incentives

Daniel Nenni

Admin
Staff member
MILPITAS, Calif., Feb. 25, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- SEMI, the industry association serving the global electronics design and manufacturing supply chain, today released the following statement from president and CEO Ajit Manocha on the support of funding incentives to expand U.S. semiconductor manufacturing and research by President Biden and a bipartisan group of members of Congress in a meeting at the White House on February 24, 2021.

"We thank President Biden and bipartisan congressional leaders for their support of incentives for U.S. semiconductor manufacturing and research. Enacting an investment tax credit and funding the programs authorized last year will help build needed semiconductor manufacturing capacity in the U.S. and reverse America's declining share of global chip production. We look forward to working with the Biden administration and Congress on these and other policies to strengthen the semiconductor manufacturing supply chain that is the lifeblood of technology innovation driving countless societal and economic benefits worldwide."

SEMI strongly supported the CHIPS for America Act, which included a refundable investment tax credit (ITC) to build U.S. semiconductor manufacturing capacity, a Commerce Department program to provide grants to semiconductor manufacturing projects, and authorizations for significant new semiconductor research programs and funding. The Fiscal Year 2021 National Defense Authorization Act signed into law this January authorized the Commerce Department and semiconductor research programs in the CHIPS for America Act but failed to provide new funding. SEMI supports enactment of all three major pillars of the CHIPS for America Act, which together will promote U.S. semiconductor research and manufacturing.

Attending the meeting with President Biden were Sens. Cornyn (R-TX), Warner (D-VA), Baldwin (D-WI), Blackburn (R-TN), Braun (R-IN), Duckworth (D-IL), Hassan (D-NH), and Portman (R-OH); and Reps. Matsui (D-CA), McCaul (R-TX), and Joyce (R-PA).

About SEMI

SEMI® connects more than 2,400 member companies and 1.3 million professionals worldwide to advance the technology and business of electronics design and manufacturing. SEMI members are responsible for the innovations in materials, design, equipment, software, devices, and services that enable smarter, faster, more powerful, and more affordable electronic products. Electronic System Design Alliance (ESD Alliance), FlexTech, the Fab Owners Alliance (FOA) and the MEMS & Sensors Industry Group (MSIG) are SEMI Strategic Technology Communities, defined communities within SEMI focused on specific technologies. Visit www.semi.org to learn more, contact one of our worldwide offices, and connect with SEMI on LinkedIn and Twitter.

SEMI Contact
Samer Bahou/SEMI
Phone: 1.408.943.7870
Email: sbahou@semi.org

SOURCE SEMI

Related Links​

http://www.semi.org
 

mozartct

New member
In the next 5 years, TSMC and Samsung capex will top $100b EACH. There are many reasons that manufacturing has migrated around but looking back at capex in past 10 years tells you much. You can't ship without tools and the US did not buy many tools in past decade (wrt these other companies). Looking forward, $37b is nothing compared to the $200b spent by TSMC and Samsung (albeit some of it will be spent here).
 

Daniel Nenni

Admin
Staff member
In the next 5 years, TSMC and Samsung capex will top $100b EACH. There are many reasons that manufacturing has migrated around but looking back at capex in past 10 years tells you much. You can't ship without tools and the US did not buy many tools in past decade (wrt these other companies). Looking forward, $37b is nothing compared to the $200b spent by TSMC and Samsung (albeit some of it will be spent here).

Any thoughts on what Intel's CAPEX will be this year? Will they overspend in a hope to catch up with TSMC or underspend since they are outsourcing more to TSMC?
 

mozartct

New member
My 2 cents: I would say boost in R&D but less capex for purpose of capacity build out. TMSC wants more capacity to accommodate more customers (Intel amongst them). intel is not trying to accommodate new customers, only to maintain/augment their lead in server/PC etc. New customers = more capacity. As you know, TSMC is still operating nearly everything they ever built (even 150 mm). Intel got out of 200 mm years ago as they had no INTERNAL need for those wafers.

One final thought: when I order a tool, I need to have a relatively firm specification. It's not enough to say I need a PVD tool. It needs to be configured to a process (more or less). TMSC is spending on known-good tool configurations to ship processes that are anticipated to yield.

It's been stated here many times: the strength of TSMC (and Samsung) is the ability to spread the risk amongst hundreds of customers. Intel has to shoulder the same risk by itself. That will hold true even if/when intel yields at 5 nm. See Apple switching its business to in-house design with better performance for reminder.
 

benb

Member
It’s remarkable how much leverage TSMC currently has on the US economy. The automotive chip shortage is having massive effects. Auto plants are being idled worldwide, affecting the US, Korea, and Europe. Meanwhile graphics cards are being launched with 2x price markups due to supply constraints.

Samsung Foundry is tiny compared to TSMC, in terms of production. The gap is close to 10x. Samsung memory consumes most of Samsung capex. So the supply constraint can’t be filled by Samsung Foundry.

In hindsight, it sure would have been nice to have a third major Foundry with capa to spare. But the economics of spare capacity are painful. Maybe that can only be fixed by having the government bear the pain.
 

Portland

Active member
Manufacturing has to be fixed in the united states. How it's done now isn't working. They treat it like working in front of a computer and it's not.

Intel in the us is a lost cause. It's broken in the corporate level as well as in schools. It will fail.and we will have to rebuild from scratch.
 
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