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Lead Based Anode to Double Battery Capacity?

Arthur Hanson

Well-known member
Lead based anodes may be the real game changer needed to make battery powered devices that need a lot of power more mainstream. This will an interesting technology to follow.

 

danxchen

New member
Many metal oxides should have this property. Intercalation of Li ion in metal oxide is nothing new. The issue is which ones have higher "coordination number" , so to speak.
 

Arthur Hanson

Well-known member
Many metal oxides should have this property. Intercalation of Li ion in metal oxide is nothing new. The issue is which ones have higher "coordination number" , so to speak.
If this is nothing new, why hasn't it been done years ago? Could you please provide some detail on this. It would be helpful in my investment decisions, which is what I do for a living. I'm interested in following the progression or non progression of technologies and why. Any insights would be appreciated. Also info on companies that are better at advancing technologies into the market.
 

Arthur Hanson

Well-known member
From chemistry and material science perspective, this is nothing new. Please see this paper and reference herein. https://www.researchgate.net/public...generate_new_ordered_rock_salt_type_structure. In terms of who is doing this commercially, I am not sure. We need to dig out.
Thanks, as soon as time permits, I'll check it out. There are more solutions to our challenges than people, including scientists and engineers that have the skill set to implement their work. Implementation in most cases is far harder than discovery and I have seen many people through pig headedness and outright greed let discoveries die or bypassed by better technologies years later. I'm do finances and design, so I have seen it from both ends. Since I'm not an engineer, I have seen many of my designs and projects only implemented when backs are to the wall or it can be proven to save lives. I have done both. I have also been involved in court cases and even had a judge removed from a case because my knowledge of law was FAR better than hers, she should have been removed from the bench permanently, but I'm sure she is still making bad rulings. The judge that replaced her, did know the law.
 

danxchen

New member
This for the note. Yes, for variety of reasons, the best technical approach may not be the ultimate winner in the marketplace. In this particular case, I have not evaluated its technical merit. However, my gut tells me that this approach may not go too far for the potential environmental reasons. Lead is not exactly a popular element for its proven harms to human health. Unless there is no alternative, I do see tremendous huddle for marketing another lead based material for batteries. The potential risk and cost may not warrant further development.
 
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