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Introducing M1 Pro and M1 Max: the most powerful chips Apple has ever built

Daniel Nenni

Admin
Staff member
Powering the all-new MacBook Pro, new chips feature up to a 10-core CPU, 32-core GPU, 64GB of unified memory, ProRes acceleration, and industry-leading power efficiency
M1 Pro and M1 Max are the most powerful chips Apple has ever built, delivering unprecedented performance and power efficiency. (Graphic: Business Wire)
M1 Pro and M1 Max are the most powerful chips Apple has ever built, delivering unprecedented performance and power efficiency. (Graphic: Business Wire)
October 18, 2021 01:49 PM Eastern Daylight Time

CUPERTINO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apple® today announced M1 Pro and M1 Max, the next breakthrough chips for the Mac®. Scaling up M1’s transformational architecture, M1 Pro offers amazing performance with industry-leading power efficiency, while M1 Max takes these capabilities to new heights. The CPU in M1 Pro and M1 Max delivers up to 70 percent faster CPU performance than M1, so tasks like compiling projects in Xcode® are faster than ever. The GPU in M1 Pro is up to 2x faster than M1, while M1 Max is up to an astonishing 4x faster than M1, allowing pro users to fly through the most demanding graphics workflows.

“M1 has transformed our most popular systems with incredible performance, custom technologies, and industry-leading power efficiency. No one has ever applied a system-on-a-chip design to a pro system until today with M1 Pro and M1 Max”
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M1 Pro and M1 Max introduce a system-on-a-chip (SoC) architecture to pro systems for the first time. The chips feature fast unified memory, industry-leading performance per watt, and incredible power efficiency, along with increased memory bandwidth and capacity. M1 Pro offers up to 200GB/s of memory bandwidth with support for up to 32GB of unified memory. M1 Max delivers up to 400GB/s of memory bandwidth — 2x that of M1 Pro and nearly 6x that of M1 — and support for up to 64GB of unified memory. And while the latest PC laptops top out at 16GB of graphics memory, having this huge amount of memory enables graphics-intensive workflows previously unimaginable on a notebook. The efficient architecture of M1 Pro and M1 Max means they deliver the same level of performance whether MacBook Pro® is plugged in or using the battery. M1 Pro and M1 Max also feature enhanced media engines with dedicated ProRes™ accelerators specifically for pro video processing. M1 Pro and M1 Max are by far the most powerful chips Apple has ever built.

“M1 has transformed our most popular systems with incredible performance, custom technologies, and industry-leading power efficiency. No one has ever applied a system-on-a-chip design to a pro system until today with M1 Pro and M1 Max,” said Johny Srouji, Apple’s senior vice president of Hardware Technologies. “With massive gains in CPU and GPU performance, up to six times the memory bandwidth, a new media engine with ProRes accelerators, and other advanced technologies, M1 Pro and M1 Max take Apple silicon even further, and are unlike anything else in a pro notebook.”

M1 Pro: A Whole New Level of Performance and Capability
Utilizing the industry-leading 5-nanometer process technology, M1 Pro packs in 33.7 billion transistors, more than 2x the amount in M1. A new 10-core CPU, including eight high-performance cores and two high-efficiency cores, is up to 70 percent faster than M1, resulting in unbelievable pro CPU performance. Compared with the latest 8-core PC laptop chip, M1 Pro delivers up to 1.7x more CPU performance at the same power level and achieves the PC chip’s peak performance using up to 70 percent less power.1 Even the most demanding tasks, like high-resolution photo editing, are handled with ease by M1 Pro.

M1 Pro has an up-to-16-core GPU that is up to 2x faster than M1 and up to 7x faster than the integrated graphics on the latest 8-core PC laptop chip.1 Compared to a powerful discrete GPU for PC notebooks, M1 Pro delivers more performance while using up to 70 percent less power.2 And M1 Pro can be configured with up to 32GB of fast unified memory, with up to 200GB/s of memory bandwidth, enabling creatives like 3D artists and game developers to do more on the go than ever before.

M1 Max: The World’s Most Powerful Chip for a Pro Notebook
M1 Max features the same powerful 10-core CPU as M1 Pro and adds a massive 32-core GPU for up to 4x faster graphics performance than M1. With 57 billion transistors — 70 percent more than M1 Pro and 3.5x more than M1 — M1 Max is the largest chip Apple has ever built. In addition, the GPU delivers performance comparable to a high-end GPU in a compact pro PC laptop while consuming up to 40 percent less power, and performance similar to that of the highest-end GPU in the largest PC laptops while using up to 100 watts less power.2 This means less heat is generated, fans run quietly and less often, and battery life is amazing in the new MacBook Pro. M1 Max transforms graphics-intensive workflows, including up to 13x faster complex timeline rendering in Final Cut Pro® compared to the previous-generation 13-inch MacBook Pro.

M1 Max also offers a higher-bandwidth on-chip fabric, and doubles the memory interface compared with M1 Pro for up to 400GB/s, or nearly 6x the memory bandwidth of M1. This allows M1 Max to be configured with up to 64GB of fast unified memory. With its unparalleled performance, M1 Max is the most powerful chip ever built for a pro notebook.

Fast, Efficient Media Engine, Now with ProRes
M1 Pro and M1 Max include an Apple-designed media engine that accelerates video processing while maximizing battery life. M1 Pro also includes dedicated acceleration for the ProRes professional video codec, allowing playback of multiple streams of high-quality 4K and 8K ProRes video while using very little power. M1 Max goes even further, delivering up to 2x faster video encoding than M1 Pro, and features two ProRes accelerators. With M1 Max, the new MacBook Pro® can transcode ProRes video in Compressor up to a remarkable 10x faster compared with the previous-generation 16-inch MacBook Pro.

Advanced Technologies for a Complete Pro System
Both M1 Pro and M1 Max are loaded with advanced custom technologies that help push pro workflows to the next level:
  • A 16-core Neural Engine for on-device machine learning acceleration and improved camera performance.
  • A new display engine drives multiple external displays.
  • Additional integrated Thunderbolt 4 controllers provide even more I/O bandwidth.
  • Apple’s custom image signal processor, along with the Neural Engine, uses computational video to enhance image quality for sharper video and more natural-looking skin tones on the built-in camera.
  • Best-in-class security, including Apple’s latest Secure Enclave, hardware-verified secure boot, and runtime anti-exploitation technologies.
A Huge Step in the Transition to Apple Silicon
The Mac is now one year into its two-year transition to Apple silicon, and M1 Pro and M1 Max represent another huge step forward. These are the most powerful and capable chips Apple has ever created, and together with M1, they form a family of chips that lead the industry in performance, custom technologies, and power efficiency.

macOS and Apps Unleash the Capabilities of M1 Pro and M1 Max
macOS® Monterey is engineered to unleash the power of M1 Pro and M1 Max, delivering breakthrough performance, phenomenal pro capabilities, and incredible battery life. By designing Monterey for Apple silicon, the Mac wakes instantly from sleep, and the entire system is fast and incredibly responsive. Developer technologies like Metal® let apps take full advantage of the new chips, and optimizations in Core ML® utilize the powerful Neural Engine so machine learning models can run even faster. Pro app workload data is used to help optimize how macOS assigns multi-threaded tasks to the CPU cores for maximum performance, and advanced power management features intelligently allocate tasks between the performance and efficiency cores for both incredible speed and battery life.

The combination of macOS with M1, M1 Pro, or M1 Max also delivers industry-leading security protections, including hardware-verified secure boot, runtime anti-exploitation technologies, and fast, in-line encryption for files. All of Apple’s Mac apps are optimized for — and run natively on — Apple silicon, and there are over 10,000 Universal apps and plug-ins available. Existing Mac apps that have not yet been updated to Universal will run seamlessly with Apple’s Rosetta® 2 technology, and users can also run iPhone® and iPad® apps directly on the Mac, opening a huge new universe of possibilities.

Apple’s Commitment to the Environment
Today, Apple is carbon neutral for global corporate operations, and by 2030, plans to have net-zero climate impact across the entire business, which includes manufacturing supply chains and all product life cycles. This also means that every chip Apple creates, from design to manufacturing, will be 100 percent carbon neutral.
1 Testing conducted by Apple in August and September 2021 using preproduction 16-inch MacBook Pro systems with Apple M1 Max, 10-core CPU, 32-core GPU, and 64GB of RAM, and preproduction 16-inch MacBook Pro systems with Apple M1 Pro, 10-core CPU, 16-core GPU, and 32GB of RAM. Performance measured using select industry-standard benchmarks. 8-core PC laptop chip performance data from testing MSI GP66 Leopard (11UG-018). Performance tests are conducted using specific computer systems and reflect the approximate performance of MacBook Pro.

2 Testing conducted by Apple in August and September 2021 using preproduction 16-inch MacBook Pro systems with Apple M1 Max, 10-core CPU, 32-core GPU, and 64GB of RAM, and preproduction 16-inch MacBook Pro systems with Apple M1 Pro, 10-core CPU, 16-core GPU, and 32GB of RAM. Performance measured using select industry-standard benchmarks. Discrete PC laptop graphics performance data from testing Lenovo Legion 5 (82JW0012US). High-end discrete PC laptop graphics performance data from testing MSI GE76 Raider (11UH-053). PC compact pro laptop performance data from testing Razer Blade 15 Advanced (RZ09-0409CE53-R3U1). Performance tests are conducted using specific computer systems and reflect the approximate performance of MacBook Pro.

Apple revolutionized personal technology with the introduction of the Macintosh in 1984. Today, Apple leads the world in innovation with iPhone, iPad, Mac, Apple Watch, and Apple TV. Apple’s five software platforms — iOS, iPadOS, macOS, watchOS, and tvOS — provide seamless experiences across all Apple devices and empower people with breakthrough services including the App Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay, and iCloud. Apple’s more than 100,000 employees are dedicated to making the best products on earth, and to leaving the world better than we found it.

NOTE TO EDITORS: For additional information visit Apple Newsroom (www.apple.com/newsroom), or call Apple’s Media Helpline at (408) 974-2042.
© 2021 Apple Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, Mac, Xcode, MacBook Pro, ProRes, Final Cut Pro, macOS, Metal, Rosetta, Core ML, iPhone, and iPad are trademarks of Apple. Other company and product names may be trademarks of their respective owners.
CT

Contacts​

Jennie Orphanopoulos
Apple
jennieo@apple.com
408-221-6621

 

Xebec

Member
Perhaps equally impressive is Apple's graphs having numbers on the X and Y axes. ;)

More seriously - I find it interesting that Apple actually *reduced* the number of small cores on M1 Max/Pro vs;. vanilla M1 -- reduced from 4 to 2. Perhaps Apple sees the small cores as for background OS tasks only and never really to be used for applications, unlike what we see on Android, and what we expect to see on Alderlake and beyond x86.

It also appears that the big CPU cores may be completely unchanged (clocks or IPC) on M1 max/pro vs. regular M1 based on Geekbench leaks -- single core performance is within a few % on all benchmarks, except for one that I saw was 6% off.
 
CPU is not really faster and still seemingly just one instruction per
clock cycle. Improvements except for graphics where parallelism
works is faster memory interface, larger cache and more GPUs. CPU is
faster because of process shrink. When X86_64 CPUs start improving
the same features and processes, M1 will be relatively even slower.
For single core compute bound applications such as simulation and
protein folding, M1s are rather useless. I think M1s are even slow
for Adobe animation suite type video applications because many
layers require many single thread cpu cycles.
 

Daniel Nenni

Admin
Staff member
CPU is not really faster and still seemingly just one instruction per
clock cycle. Improvements except for graphics where parallelism
works is faster memory interface, larger cache and more GPUs. CPU is
faster because of process shrink. When X86_64 CPUs start improving
the same features and processes, M1 will be relatively even slower.
For single core compute bound applications such as simulation and
protein folding, M1s are rather useless. I think M1s are even slow
for Adobe animation suite type video applications because many
layers require many single thread cpu cycles.

Performance per watt is key for Apple. Those are the benchmarks I watt to see.
 

hist78

Well-known member
CPU is not really faster and still seemingly just one instruction per
clock cycle. Improvements except for graphics where parallelism
works is faster memory interface, larger cache and more GPUs. CPU is
faster because of process shrink. When X86_64 CPUs start improving
the same features and processes, M1 will be relatively even slower.
For single core compute bound applications such as simulation and
protein folding, M1s are rather useless. I think M1s are even slow
for Adobe animation suite type video applications because many
layers require many single thread cpu cycles.
I'm wondering currently what's the best (or better) CPU and platform for simulation (type?) and protein folding? Thanks.
 

mgoldsmith1979

New member
More seriously - I find it interesting that Apple actually *reduced* the number of small cores on M1 Max/Pro vs;. vanilla M1 -- reduced from 4 to 2. Perhaps Apple sees the small cores as for background OS tasks only and never really to be used for applications, unlike what we see on Android, and what we expect to see on Alderlake and beyond x86.
M1 is reused in the iPad Pro, where running iOS there should be more benefit to the 4E cores. For MacOS on laptop / desktop only applications, I agree that the E cores are probably not as useful. But if the die shot images they shared are to be believed, then the 2E cores on Pro / Max share the same sized L2$ as 4E cores on M1, so there will be some IPC uplift from that. Additional mem BW from the move to LP5 will also benefit the E cores, assuming they were BW limited on the M1. So could be they get net ~60-65% of the perf with half the number of cores, not clear. But somehow 8P+2E is only ~1.7x 4P+4E, and I find that odd.
 

Daniel Nenni

Admin
Staff member
One thing Intel has to realize is that by developing their own chips Apple can start the software development process early using simulation, emulation, and prototyping. And tuning the SoC to the software is a huge competitive advantage.

Car companies will follow Tesla into silicon for the same reasons, absolutely.
 

Xebec

Member
Performance per watt is key for Apple. Those are the benchmarks I wat to see.
Daniel - Anandtech has some info on that topic for integer code at least:

This chart shows an energy efficiency calculation for performance in Specint2017, vs Joules used to complete the task.

The chart shows A15 efficiency at "7.28" vs. A14 at 6.47 and Cortex-X1 at 4.48.

The source article mentions the M1 at 6.66.

If M1 Pro and Max are indeed on the same exact process as Vanilla M1, it sounds like at the speeds they're running at - they're a little more efficient than A14 but ~ 10% less efficient or so than A15, at least in this test.

..

Source:
https://www.anandtech.com/show/16983/the-apple-a15-soc-performance-review-faster-more-efficient/2
"On an adjacent note, with a score of 7.28 in the integer suite, Apple’s A15 P-core is on equal footing with AMD’s Zen3-based Ryzen 5950X with a score of 7.29, and ahead of M1 with a score of 6.66."
 
I write the CVC digital Verilog HDL simulator. Main
determinant of simulator value is simulation speed
(can over night regressions for complex chips be
completed overnight?). Verilog simulation is limited
by integer CPU performance. There are other types of
simulation that are limited by floating point performance.

The fastest CPUs are the AMD and INTC X86_64 architecture
multi-core CPUs. I think fastest between the two companies
may depend on the particular application also super
computer design (governments are announcing packaging X86_64
CPUs into supper computers constantly) such as cooling,
memory speed and caches. IPC (instructions per cycle)
is speed determinant because CPUs have the same
maximum clock cycle rate. AMD and INTC are way in the
lead and both are continually improving IPC rates.

I think the AI deep learning chips being faster is mostly
hype. Although there are probably applications that the
AI chips are faster for.

Also, parallelization (millions of simple GPUs say) has
the problem that it runs into Amdahls law that the slowest
computation step dominates speed. An example is trying
to crack RSA cryptography. Many of the factorization
steps can be parallelized, but there is a "very large"
matrix inversion involved that is the limiting factor.

Cadence parallel Verilog simulator called Xcelium
(really NC) uses X86_64 CPUs for its nodes. Cadence
purchased a computer I think called something like
Rocketsim for its parallel technology. Rocketsim
used GPUs but the Cadence product was changed to X86_64.
My view is that Xcelium parallelization is no better than
normal designers partioning SoC simulation onto
different nodes.

I once discussed working on designing hardware chips
for digital Verilog simulation with some company financed
by Costello. Problem was that a Verilog simulation chip
can be 10x faster than software, but the X86_64 chip
pipeline and multi-issue CPUs were 10 times faster than
any buildable custom chip. Off the shelf CPUs are a lot
cheaper.

There are many applications where IPC rate is important
such as climate simulation (physicist Freeman Dyson
though climate models were wrong and useless because
impossible amounts of extra computation were needed).
Other example are EDA tools, animation creation (not
video watching), protein folding and vaccine design, etc.

I disagree with Nenni's power saving view. My old
LG Android cell was plenty fast.
 

Simon

New member
Powering the all-new MacBook Pro, new chips feature up to a 10-core CPU, 32-core GPU, 64GB of unified memory, ProRes acceleration, and industry-leading power efficiency
M1 Pro and M1 Max are the most powerful chips Apple has ever built, delivering unprecedented performance and power efficiency. (Graphic: Business Wire)
M1 Pro and M1 Max are the most powerful chips Apple has ever built, delivering unprecedented performance and power efficiency. (Graphic: Business Wire)
October 18, 2021 01:49 PM Eastern Daylight Time

CUPERTINO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apple® today announced M1 Pro and M1 Max, the next breakthrough chips for the Mac®. Scaling up M1’s transformational architecture, M1 Pro offers amazing performance with industry-leading power efficiency, while M1 Max takes these capabilities to new heights. The CPU in M1 Pro and M1 Max delivers up to 70 percent faster CPU performance than M1, so tasks like compiling projects in Xcode® are faster than ever. The GPU in M1 Pro is up to 2x faster than M1, while M1 Max is up to an astonishing 4x faster than M1, allowing pro users to fly through the most demanding graphics workflows.



M1 Pro and M1 Max introduce a system-on-a-chip (SoC) architecture to pro systems for the first time. The chips feature fast unified memory, industry-leading performance per watt, and incredible power efficiency, along with increased memory bandwidth and capacity. M1 Pro offers up to 200GB/s of memory bandwidth with support for up to 32GB of unified memory. M1 Max delivers up to 400GB/s of memory bandwidth — 2x that of M1 Pro and nearly 6x that of M1 — and support for up to 64GB of unified memory. And while the latest PC laptops top out at 16GB of graphics memory, having this huge amount of memory enables graphics-intensive workflows previously unimaginable on a notebook. The efficient architecture of M1 Pro and M1 Max means they deliver the same level of performance whether MacBook Pro® is plugged in or using the battery. M1 Pro and M1 Max also feature enhanced media engines with dedicated ProRes™ accelerators specifically for pro video processing. M1 Pro and M1 Max are by far the most powerful chips Apple has ever built.

“M1 has transformed our most popular systems with incredible performance, custom technologies, and industry-leading power efficiency. No one has ever applied a system-on-a-chip design to a pro system until today with M1 Pro and M1 Max,” said Johny Srouji, Apple’s senior vice president of Hardware Technologies. “With massive gains in CPU and GPU performance, up to six times the memory bandwidth, a new media engine with ProRes accelerators, and other advanced technologies, M1 Pro and M1 Max take Apple silicon even further, and are unlike anything else in a pro notebook.”

M1 Pro: A Whole New Level of Performance and Capability
Utilizing the industry-leading 5-nanometer process technology, M1 Pro packs in 33.7 billion transistors, more than 2x the amount in M1. A new 10-core CPU, including eight high-performance cores and two high-efficiency cores, is up to 70 percent faster than M1, resulting in unbelievable pro CPU performance. Compared with the latest 8-core PC laptop chip, M1 Pro delivers up to 1.7x more CPU performance at the same power level and achieves the PC chip’s peak performance using up to 70 percent less power.1 Even the most demanding tasks, like high-resolution photo editing, are handled with ease by M1 Pro.

M1 Pro has an up-to-16-core GPU that is up to 2x faster than M1 and up to 7x faster than the integrated graphics on the latest 8-core PC laptop chip.1 Compared to a powerful discrete GPU for PC notebooks, M1 Pro delivers more performance while using up to 70 percent less power.2 And M1 Pro can be configured with up to 32GB of fast unified memory, with up to 200GB/s of memory bandwidth, enabling creatives like 3D artists and game developers to do more on the go than ever before.

M1 Max: The World’s Most Powerful Chip for a Pro Notebook
M1 Max features the same powerful 10-core CPU as M1 Pro and adds a massive 32-core GPU for up to 4x faster graphics performance than M1. With 57 billion transistors — 70 percent more than M1 Pro and 3.5x more than M1 — M1 Max is the largest chip Apple has ever built. In addition, the GPU delivers performance comparable to a high-end GPU in a compact pro PC laptop while consuming up to 40 percent less power, and performance similar to that of the highest-end GPU in the largest PC laptops while using up to 100 watts less power.2 This means less heat is generated, fans run quietly and less often, and battery life is amazing in the new MacBook Pro. M1 Max transforms graphics-intensive workflows, including up to 13x faster complex timeline rendering in Final Cut Pro® compared to the previous-generation 13-inch MacBook Pro.

M1 Max also offers a higher-bandwidth on-chip fabric, and doubles the memory interface compared with M1 Pro for up to 400GB/s, or nearly 6x the memory bandwidth of M1. This allows M1 Max to be configured with up to 64GB of fast unified memory. With its unparalleled performance, M1 Max is the most powerful chip ever built for a pro notebook.

Fast, Efficient Media Engine, Now with ProRes
M1 Pro and M1 Max include an Apple-designed media engine that accelerates video processing while maximizing battery life. M1 Pro also includes dedicated acceleration for the ProRes professional video codec, allowing playback of multiple streams of high-quality 4K and 8K ProRes video while using very little power. M1 Max goes even further, delivering up to 2x faster video encoding than M1 Pro, and features two ProRes accelerators. With M1 Max, the new MacBook Pro® can transcode ProRes video in Compressor up to a remarkable 10x faster compared with the previous-generation 16-inch MacBook Pro.

Advanced Technologies for a Complete Pro System
Both M1 Pro and M1 Max are loaded with advanced custom technologies that help push pro workflows to the next level:
  • A 16-core Neural Engine for on-device machine learning acceleration and improved camera performance.
  • A new display engine drives multiple external displays.
  • Additional integrated Thunderbolt 4 controllers provide even more I/O bandwidth.
  • Apple’s custom image signal processor, along with the Neural Engine, uses computational video to enhance image quality for sharper video and more natural-looking skin tones on the built-in camera.
  • Best-in-class security, including Apple’s latest Secure Enclave, hardware-verified secure boot, and runtime anti-exploitation technologies.
A Huge Step in the Transition to Apple Silicon
The Mac is now one year into its two-year transition to Apple silicon, and M1 Pro and M1 Max represent another huge step forward. These are the most powerful and capable chips Apple has ever created, and together with M1, they form a family of chips that lead the industry in performance, custom technologies, and power efficiency.

macOS and Apps Unleash the Capabilities of M1 Pro and M1 Max
macOS® Monterey is engineered to unleash the power of M1 Pro and M1 Max, delivering breakthrough performance, phenomenal pro capabilities, and incredible battery life. By designing Monterey for Apple silicon, the Mac wakes instantly from sleep, and the entire system is fast and incredibly responsive. Developer technologies like Metal® let apps take full advantage of the new chips, and optimizations in Core ML® utilize the powerful Neural Engine so machine learning models can run even faster. Pro app workload data is used to help optimize how macOS assigns multi-threaded tasks to the CPU cores for maximum performance, and advanced power management features intelligently allocate tasks between the performance and efficiency cores for both incredible speed and battery life.

The combination of macOS with M1, M1 Pro, or M1 Max also delivers industry-leading security protections, including hardware-verified secure boot, runtime anti-exploitation technologies, and fast, in-line encryption for files. All of Apple’s Mac apps are optimized for — and run natively on — Apple silicon, and there are over 10,000 Universal apps and plug-ins available. Existing Mac apps that have not yet been updated to Universal will run seamlessly with Apple’s Rosetta® 2 technology, and users can also run iPhone® and iPad® apps directly on the Mac, opening a huge new universe of possibilities.

Apple’s Commitment to the Environment
Today, Apple is carbon neutral for global corporate operations, and by 2030, plans to have net-zero climate impact across the entire business, which includes manufacturing supply chains and all product life cycles. This also means that every chip Apple creates, from design to manufacturing, will be 100 percent carbon neutral.
1 Testing conducted by Apple in August and September 2021 using preproduction 16-inch MacBook Pro systems with Apple M1 Max, 10-core CPU, 32-core GPU, and 64GB of RAM, and preproduction 16-inch MacBook Pro systems with Apple M1 Pro, 10-core CPU, 16-core GPU, and 32GB of RAM. Performance measured using select industry-standard benchmarks. 8-core PC laptop chip performance data from testing MSI GP66 Leopard (11UG-018). Performance tests are conducted using specific computer systems and reflect the approximate performance of MacBook Pro.

2 Testing conducted by Apple in August and September 2021 using preproduction 16-inch MacBook Pro systems with Apple M1 Max, 10-core CPU, 32-core GPU, and 64GB of RAM, and preproduction 16-inch MacBook Pro systems with Apple M1 Pro, 10-core CPU, 16-core GPU, and 32GB of RAM. Performance measured using select industry-standard benchmarks. Discrete PC laptop graphics performance data from testing Lenovo Legion 5 (82JW0012US). High-end discrete PC laptop graphics performance data from testing MSI GE76 Raider (11UH-053). PC compact pro laptop performance data from testing Razer Blade 15 Advanced (RZ09-0409CE53-R3U1). Performance tests are conducted using specific computer systems and reflect the approximate performance of MacBook Pro.

Apple revolutionized personal technology with the introduction of the Macintosh in 1984. Today, Apple leads the world in innovation with iPhone, iPad, Mac, Apple Watch, and Apple TV. Apple’s five software platforms — iOS, iPadOS, macOS, watchOS, and tvOS — provide seamless experiences across all Apple devices and empower people with breakthrough services including the App Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay, and iCloud. Apple’s more than 100,000 employees are dedicated to making the best products on earth, and to leaving the world better than we found it.

NOTE TO EDITORS: For additional information visit Apple Newsroom (www.apple.com/newsroom), or call Apple’s Media Helpline at (408) 974-2042.
© 2021 Apple Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, Mac, Xcode, MacBook Pro, ProRes, Final Cut Pro, macOS, Metal, Rosetta, Core ML, iPhone, and iPad are trademarks of Apple. Other company and product names may be trademarks of their respective owners.
CT

Contacts​

Jennie Orphanopoulos
Apple
jennieo@apple.com
408-221-6621

Who's DRAM is used in the M1/Pro/Max chip modules ?
 
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