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Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger brings back Sanjay Natarajan

Daniel Nenni

Admin
Staff member
"It's with mixed emotions that I will be leaving Applied Materials this Friday after 3 1/2 wonderful years there. I'm so grateful to have been able to work with this amazing team on groundbreaking innovations in the area of Integrated Materials Solutions (IMS). I truly believe this is an essential element of Applied's new playbook for keeping Moore's Law going, and I'm honored to be able to be a part of it. I appreciate the visionary leadership in this arena by Mukund Srinivasan, Prabu Raja, and Gary Dickerson, and I look forward to watching how much IMS contributes to the success of our industry going forward.

As for the next chapter in my career, I'm thrilled to be going back "home" to Intel Corporation after six years away to be a part of the Logic Technology Development team. What has motivated me for my entire career has been an unwavering belief in the power of technology to improve the lives of every person on the planet. Intel led the way for most of its 50+ year history, and I firmly believe that Intel can once again lead the industry in process technology development. I couldn't be more excited to be a part of making that happen. Can't wait to get started! #iamintel"

LinkedIn:

Sanjay Natarajan
Portland Oregon

"Over 25 years spent in pursuit of Moore's Law. Has been a glorious opportunity to help get computers out of the corporate air-conditioned rooms and into everybody's hands and laps. Now that Moore's Law in is trouble, working hard to unstick it as fast as I can!"

Intel
Senior Vice President and Co-General Manager, Logic Technology Development
March - 2021 - Present

Intel
Vice President, Technology & Manufacturing Group; Director, 14nm CMOS Technology Development
June 1993 - July 2015


Another good sign that Pat Gelsinger will be able to make informed decisions with people he can trust, absolutely.
 

hist78

Active member
I'm wondering to bring back the old guard of Intel might be necessary, but can Pat Gelsinger recruit more talented people who did not previously work at Intel?

Can he bring new talents and fresh ideas to Intel?

Or people with new talents and fresh ideas would rather not to join Intel?
 

Daniel Nenni

Admin
Staff member
I'm wondering to bring back the old guard of Intel might be necessary, but can Pat Gelsinger recruit more talented people who did not previously work at Intel?

Can he bring new talents and fresh ideas to Intel?

Or people with new talents and fresh ideas would rather not to join Intel?

I have semiconductor friends at Google, Amazon, Facebook, Tesla, and now AirBnB. I guess domain specific silicon is much more exciting than general purpose CPUs and GPUs.

It is probably more about working inside a semi flat organization versus a pyramid with forbidden rooms and secret chambers.

 
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hist78

Active member
I have semiconductor friends at Google, Amazon, Facebook, Tesla, and now AirBnB. I guess domain specific silicon is much more exciting than general purpose CPUs and GPUs.

It is probably more about working inside a semi flat organization versus a pyramid with forbidden rooms and secret chambers.


Even AirBnB?

It's a great challenge for Intel not only to recruit new talents but also to retain talents they already have.
 

Portland

Active member
Google wanted to open a semiconductor design center in Israel. Israelis are great engineers and they have mechanics and technicians that at best rare anywhere else but they are horrible sales people and that's their big weakness.

It's more Google getting stronger.
 

hist78

Active member
Google wanted to open a semiconductor design center in Israel. Israelis are great engineers and they have mechanics and technicians that at best rare anywhere else but they are horrible sales people and that's their big weakness.

It's more Google getting stronger.

Israel indeed has a lot talents that many technology companies have set up shops there to utilize such wonderful resources.

It's a similar situation in Taiwan when we look into semiconductor and computer industry. For example Google, Microsoft, ASML, Applied Materials, Texas Instruments, and Micron Technology all have significant development, operations, and/or manufacturing activities in Taiwan to tap into the engineering and manufacturing capabilities there.

Strangely Intel doesn't seem to have either major manufacturing or development presence in Taiwan. Could it partially contribute to Intel's problems they are facing today?
 

Saicharan1919

New member
Can the reason for not having its presence in Taiwan be political? China's biggest advantage from the US is the foundry, right?
Israel indeed has a lot talents that many technology companies have set up shops there to utilize such wonderful resources.

It's a similar situation in Taiwan when we look into semiconductor and computer industry. For example Google, Microsoft, ASML, Applied Materials, Texas Instruments, and Micron Technology all have significant development, operations, and/or manufacturing activities in Taiwan to tap into the engineering and manufacturing capabilities there.

Strangely Intel doesn't seem to have either major manufacturing or development presence in Taiwan. Could it partially contribute to Intel's problems they are facing today?
 

hist78

Active member
Can the reason for not having its presence in Taiwan be political? China's biggest advantage from the US is the foundry, right?
"China's biggest advantage from the US is the foundry, right?"

Which China are you talking about?

Republic of China (Taiwan) has been US' ally since WWII. In Taiwan Intel has major suppliers/partners such as TSMC, UMC, MediaTek and major customers such as Asus, Acer, Foxconn, Quanta Computer, and Compal. Intel needs to be there, especially in the R&D area.
 

benb

Active member
Where you do your R&D (or Logic TD) matters. I think it matters more than the people, since the people and the place go hand in hand.
I feel like Intel TD was stronger when the footprint in Silicon Valley was greater. This is because it was dedicated to TD. Intel sites that share TD and production, inevitably become more production than TD, and the TD suffers.
TSMC definitely mixes TD and production too, but does it in a unique way. The newest fabs are pretty much all production. The older fabs with the most experienced people are doing TD, in a distributed way. There is a lot more TD going on at TSMC than Intel, consequently.
 

Saicharan1919

New member
"China's biggest advantage from the US is the foundry, right?"

Which China are you talking about?

Republic of China (Taiwan) has been US' ally since WWII. In Taiwan Intel has major suppliers/partners such as TSMC, UMC, MediaTek and major customers such as Asus, Acer, Foxconn, Quanta Computer, and Compal. Intel needs to be there, especially in the R&D area.
Thanks, @hist78. So, now it's exciting to know why Intel is not having their centres in Taiwan.
 
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