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High-NA might be last-gen litho

pgerven

New member
Apologies for the shameless self-promotion, but I believe folks around here will appreciate my interview with ASML CTO Martin van den Brink. He confirmed that ASML is looking into >0.7 NA EUV litho as a potential successor to high-NA, as hinted at by Intel's Mark Phillips. However, Van den Brink is not at all convinced hyper-NA will ever make it into production. In other words, high-NA might mark the end of the semiconductor lithography roadmap.

Check out the interview on Bits&Chips
 

Fred Chen

Moderator
Apologies for the shameless self-promotion, but I believe folks around here will appreciate my interview with ASML CTO Martin van den Brink. He confirmed that ASML is looking into >0.7 NA EUV litho as a potential successor to high-NA, as hinted at by Intel's Mark Phillips. However, Van den Brink is not at all convinced hyper-NA will ever make it into production. In other words, high-NA might mark the end of the semiconductor lithography roadmap.

Check out the interview on Bits&Chips
The polarization impact from such high NA is too restrictive.

The 16-18 nm pitch target by High-NA is already questionable.

 
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Xebec

Active member
Curious - when it is stated that Hyper-NA might never be economically feasible - I assume that’s ‘full picture’ economics - throughput, energy requirements, etc? And not referring to the initial machine cost only?

Thanks
 

Fred Chen

Moderator
"But how much room is left in the market for even larger lenses? Could we even sell those systems? I was paranoid about high-NA and I’m even more paranoid about hyper-NA. If the cost of hyper-NA grows as fast as we’ve seen with high-NA, it will pretty much be economically unfeasible. Although, in itself, that’s also a technological issue. And that’s what we’re looking into.”
 

Fred Chen

Moderator
Some of Intel's statements on the High-NA tool status indicate it's not even fully into development yet:


IC: When I was in Intel’s D1X Fab (the development fab), I did get to see the EUV machines up close. I touched one and then got told off for it! It was also fun to look inside it as well, because you guys are still installing so many of these machines. When High-NA comes around, if by some reason it's not ready, or there are other challenges, could I surmise from what you're saying that for the future nodes that are along those timeframes, if they are ready earlier, the idea is to bring it in earlier? Or if it doesn't arrive as intended, that there's flexibility for those layers that may or may not have been High-NA?

AK: Correct. We're aiming to introduce it in more in 2025, and we're setting up our processes so that if for some reason High-NA is not ready, then we will be able to continue without it. As soon as High-NA is ready, then we'll be able to put it into our product and use it.

IC: Intel already has orders in for High-NA machines from ASML. The first-gen NXE:5000 for development, and it's just been announced that you've ordered a second generation NXE:5200. What exactly will you be using the High-NA development machine for?

AK:
The NXE:5000 is currently being built for us at ASML. When I visited ASML late last year, I saw the pieces as it was being built and put together. But we're also working with ASML, and as soon as their first High-NA tool is available for us, we will be running some of our experiments in their lab on that. so that will we will be starting as early possible. So as soon as the NXE:5000 docks, they will be able to cut over and then run it in our own Fab. So we have a very active team working right now with ASML, and those teams are working through all the line items that need to get done, so that by the time the NXE:5000 arrives, that we're good to go and good to go on the development work in our Fab.

IC: When I'm quoted how long it takes to install an EUV machine and tune it, usually it's about six months for each, will the first-gen High-NA UV machine be similar or are you trying to improve that?

AK:
We're always striving to drive down the qual (qualification) time. Right now, I'm not in a position to quote what its final qual time will be, but we will be taking as much as possible in learning out of the install quals of the 0.33 NA (regular EUV), basically to apply them to the 0.5 NA (High-NA). There is work to be done, is the simplest way of putting it.
 

blueone

Active member
So X-Ray lithography is off the table? It has looked like that since IBM played with XR in the 1990s, and photons outran them, so to speak.
 
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Fred Chen

Moderator
So X-Ray lithography is off the table? It's has looked like that since IBM played with XR in the 1990s, and photons outran them, so to speak.
For a while there was talk of BEUV (6.7 nm) but it seems that was not considered ahead of increasing NA (at same 13.X wavelength). Presumably, shorter wavelength would have more leftover energy (i.e., secondary electron) complications.
 
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