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Automation of Everything to Disrupt World Order

Arthur Hanson

Well-known member
The automation of everything will greatly disrupt the world order and business world. Manual labor and even the professions are going to be in for economic shocks worldwide. Many of the professions will erect legislative and professional barriers to protect their own interests above all others. Up to forty percent of medical could be easily automated and it is the single largest industry in the US and a dominant force worldwide. Professions that thought they would be immune to automation are going to be in for a big surprise. They will do everything to keep their actions from being transparent and rationalize their actions to keep their substandard, inefficient, high-cost methods in place. Platforms will disrupt the professions, just like robotics will disrupt manual labor. The combination of robotics and platforms will disrupt everything in between. Modern communications and data centers will bring progress on real time, speeding the advances as databases literally learn on the fly, taking the speed of progress to levels even now considered impossible. This will all take massive computing, memory and high-speed, low-cost communications to make this happen. The companies and organizations that can get around these barriers and challenges will be the dominant players in the future if they succeed. The grossly expensive education lobby will only be able to succeed intact if they can throw a monkey wrench into the coming changes. Never underestimate the power of ignorance, which is one of the dominant forces in politics and business. You need to look no farther than to see that Xi, Putin and Biden have no ethics when it comes to holding back peace and progress.

Thoughts, additions and challenges sought and welcomed; this is part of the progress that is needed.
 

count

Well-known member
The automation of everything is a slow process that has been ongoing for the last 100+ years. More and more industries will get increasingly automated, sure, but this is happening over the span of multiple decades. As an example, people were talking about self driving trucks putting drivers out of work like it was going to happen in a couple of years since 2014. This is still likely a decade away and there is a massive shortage of truck drivers now, as fewer drivers are entering a job that they believe may be automated away.
 

Xebec

Active member
The automation of everything will greatly disrupt the world order and business world. Manual labor and even the professions are going to be in for economic shocks worldwide. Many of the professions will erect legislative and professional barriers to protect their own interests above all others. Up to forty percent of medical could be easily automated and it is the single largest industry in the US and a dominant force worldwide. Professions that thought they would be immune to automation are going to be in for a big surprise. They will do everything to keep their actions from being transparent and rationalize their actions to keep their substandard, inefficient, high-cost methods in place. Platforms will disrupt the professions, just like robotics will disrupt manual labor. The combination of robotics and platforms will disrupt everything in between. Modern communications and data centers will bring progress on real time, speeding the advances as databases literally learn on the fly, taking the speed of progress to levels even now considered impossible. This will all take massive computing, memory and high-speed, low-cost communications to make this happen. The companies and organizations that can get around these barriers and challenges will be the dominant players in the future if they succeed. The grossly expensive education lobby will only be able to succeed intact if they can throw a monkey wrench into the coming changes. Never underestimate the power of ignorance, which is one of the dominant forces in politics and business. You need to look no farther than to see that Xi, Putin and Biden have no ethics when it comes to holding back peace and progress.

Thoughts, additions and challenges sought and welcomed; this is part of the progress that is needed.
I 100% agree with your thinking process that obfuscation of inefficiency is an enormous barrier to automation and making things better in general. The more layers of bureaucracy there are, the harder it is to figure out how to simplify and automate something. The Real Estate industry is probably the perfect example of this (at least in the USA...)

IMO the best way to get "automation of everything" in a given field is to introduce some combination of disruptive technology, business plans, and execution that force the 'dinosaurs' in that area to change (drastically). These things take time, but as count has suggested - these things are happening. See Tesla changing the car industry, Ride sharing/AirBNB disrupting traditional yellow cab and hotel processes, SpaceX disrupting innovation at the oligarchy of global Defense contractors, etc.

The real risk is keeping progress and technology levels sufficiently maintained that these natural processes can happen. There are a lot of head winds - in addition to various leaders making poor decisions - are the apparatuses that support them, declining birth rates, climate change, ecological damage, etc. I hate to say it, but human lifespan tends to limit progress as people fight to hold onto whatever is the easiest way for them to generate resources.. (least change).

On education - I think we're starting to see some progress there. MIT and a lot of other groups (due to internal pressures I'm sure) are starting to making more and more content available for free.. the problem is getting employers to think past "must have a degree" for someone to be good at something. (a self imposed restriction the free market -- self-employed -- do not have).

EDIT: While I find this conversation very interesting, I'm not sure if this is intended to be in scope for semiwiki.com :) ..
 

Arthur Hanson

Well-known member
I 100% agree with your thinking process that obfuscation of inefficiency is an enormous barrier to automation and making things better in general. The more layers of bureaucracy there are, the harder it is to figure out how to simplify and automate something. The Real Estate industry is probably the perfect example of this (at least in the USA...)

IMO the best way to get "automation of everything" in a given field is to introduce some combination of disruptive technology, business plans, and execution that force the 'dinosaurs' in that area to change (drastically). These things take time, but as count has suggested - these things are happening. See Tesla changing the car industry, Ride sharing/AirBNB disrupting traditional yellow cab and hotel processes, SpaceX disrupting innovation at the oligarchy of global Defense contractors, etc.

The real risk is keeping progress and technology levels sufficiently maintained that these natural processes can happen. There are a lot of head winds - in addition to various leaders making poor decisions - are the apparatuses that support them, declining birth rates, climate change, ecological damage, etc. I hate to say it, but human lifespan tends to limit progress as people fight to hold onto whatever is the easiest way for them to generate resources.. (least change).

On education - I think we're starting to see some progress there. MIT and a lot of other groups (due to internal pressures I'm sure) are starting to making more and more content available for free.. the problem is getting employers to think past "must have a degree" for someone to be good at something. (a self imposed restriction the free market -- self-employed -- do not have).

EDIT: While I find this conversation very interesting, I'm not sure if this is intended to be in scope for semiwiki.com :) ..
It is definitely in the scope of semiwiki, for everything from memory, to processing to communications will change to meet the coming changes. I will elaborate in future posts.
 

cliff

Active member
Finfets + smaller pitch bumps + silicon interposers + stackable memory makes the AI and optimization algorithms written in the 60's - 80's practical. This is new era. Expect drastic changes.

I agree with Arthur that this is definitely in the scope of SemiWiki. Semiconductor technology is changing our world quickly (miliary, economies, agriculture, etc).
 

tooLongInEDA

Moderator
I 100% agree with your thinking process that obfuscation of inefficiency is an enormous barrier to automation and making things better in general. The more layers of bureaucracy there are, the harder it is to figure out how to simplify and automate something. The Real Estate industry is probably the perfect example of this (at least in the USA...)

IMO the best way to get "automation of everything" in a given field is to introduce some combination of disruptive technology, business plans, and execution that force the 'dinosaurs' in that area to change (drastically). These things take time, but as count has suggested - these things are happening. See Tesla changing the car industry, Ride sharing/AirBNB disrupting traditional yellow cab and hotel processes, SpaceX disrupting innovation at the oligarchy of global Defense contractors, etc.

The real risk is keeping progress and technology levels sufficiently maintained that these natural processes can happen. There are a lot of head winds - in addition to various leaders making poor decisions - are the apparatuses that support them, declining birth rates, climate change, ecological damage, etc. I hate to say it, but human lifespan tends to limit progress as people fight to hold onto whatever is the easiest way for them to generate resources.. (least change).

On education - I think we're starting to see some progress there. MIT and a lot of other groups (due to internal pressures I'm sure) are starting to making more and more content available for free.. the problem is getting employers to think past "must have a degree" for someone to be good at something. (a self imposed restriction the free market -- self-employed -- do not have).

EDIT: While I find this conversation very interesting, I'm not sure if this is intended to be in scope for semiwiki.com :) ..
I hadn't really given much thought to the implications for education yet. But it does seem to me that it is now quite possible to learn pretty much anything on line for very little outlay these days. These limitations - likely a few more - remain:

1) you can't easily do lab work and gains hands-on experience this way
2) you miss the human aspects of learning (teamwork, networking, etc) if this is the only way you learn
3) you don't get the paper qualification
4) there is no guarantee of periodic assessment and perhaps little access to tutors to correct and guide students

For me, 1) and 2) are things that do need to be covered in some way (abnd the majority of degrees probably don't include much lab work). 3) seems less important for many jobs these days (though vital for some) - when the skills required change so rapidly, the ability to adapt and learn new skills on the job seems far more important and I'm not convinced that a degree qualification is the most reliable indicator.

It's almost certainly possible to restructure large parts of education - I'm mainly thinking degree and adult education - to be both more efficient (more learned per time spent) at much lower cost. That also neesds rethinking current job recruitment practice to focus far more on candidates skills and potential and likely putting more time and effort into this (unless we find a way to better automate that too - but this is the last area I'd be looking to automate). I think start-ups and small businesses are in a much better situation to do this.
 
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