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TSMC may surpass Intel in quarterly revenue for first time

lilo777

Active member
The revenues for these two companies have a very different nature though. TSMC revenues come from the foundry business and Intel's - from IDM business. Just as an example, Wallmart revenues for 2021 were $559.15B even though they don't produce anything. But they resell, a lot. So, I assume, the cost of everything they purchase automatically translates into their revenues (once they resell it). They can easily generate trillion in revenues and 0 in profits.

Obviously TSMC and Intel businesses are closer to each other than to Walmart so revenue comparisons are not totally pointless. If one is looking to invest in semiconductor industry, revenues might be a factor (just one of many). Once Intel build their foundry business, it'll be interesting to compare the revenues (and other parameters) of the two foundry businesses.
 

Daniel Nenni

Admin
Staff member
It is bound to happen. TSMC is posting double digit revenue increases, above and beyond what the semiconductor industry on a whole does. In 2023-2025 this will include a big revenue jump from the Intel N3 business so it is in a way double counting.
 

VCT

Active member
Not only 12th Gen Alder Lake. Intel 11th Gen Rocket Lake also have tons of inventory.

Intel told customers in 2021 Q4 that Intel GPU supply in 2022 will be limited and not enough. But it looks like Intel GPU will be hard to sell now. (after desktop GPU delaying for 6 months)
 

Xebec

Active member
It's interesting that this was standard practice in the 1990s and early 2000s. Every month or quarter they'd release a new price list with small cuts on many/most processors, especially as new speed grades came out... Then sometime around/after Core 2 the "Intel processor price list" PDF disappeared and Intel (and later AMD) both just played games to keep prices per tier fixed whenever possible.

I often wonder if this was Dennard scaling breaking down or something else (more than just competition). I miss the days when you could count on a 10% frequency bump every 3 months at a given price on top of gains from new architectures every few years..
 

hist78

Well-known member
Not only 12th Gen Alder Lake. Intel 11th Gen Rocket Lake also have tons of inventory.

Intel told customers in 2021 Q4 that Intel GPU supply in 2022 will be limited and not enough. But it looks like Intel GPU will be hard to sell now. (after desktop GPU delaying for 6 months)

Intel and AMD normally will cut their prices before releasing newer generations of products. Intel's cut seems earlier than I thought. In one to two weeks we are going to see companies' Q2 earnings. Hope nothing is going to be too depressing.
 

hist78

Well-known member
It's interesting that this was standard practice in the 1990s and early 2000s. Every month or quarter they'd release a new price list with small cuts on many/most processors, especially as new speed grades came out... Then sometime around/after Core 2 the "Intel processor price list" PDF disappeared and Intel (and later AMD) both just played games to keep prices per tier fixed whenever possible.

I often wonder if this was Dennard scaling breaking down or something else (more than just competition). I miss the days when you could count on a 10% frequency bump every 3 months at a given price on top of gains from new architectures every few years..

Indeed the market is more complicated and dynamic than before. More activities and noise are coming from non x86 market. In a typical friends and families gathering, people talk about and around those new and old smartphones they have. I haven't heard uncle Joe announced he just got a new i7 laptop for a long time.
 
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